Books shelved under “New Adult”

12 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Loveless

    Loveless

    by Alice Oseman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As someone who is herself aromantic and asexual, I was very much anticipating Loveless, to the point where I pre-ordered it. My experience with Alice Oseman has been varied: I adored Radio Silence but didn’t much care for Solitaire. Here I find myself very ambivalent: on one hand, I really enjoyed the aro/ace representation here. On the other hand, I’m not sure that, overall, Loveless is a very good book.

    A note about…

  2. Book cover for Jumper

    Jumper

    by Steven Gould

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’ve had Jumper on my computer for a while now and never got around to reading it, not sure why. Sometimes with books like that, I feel extra trepidation going into it. Why haven’t I read it yet? Is it because I can sense it’s bad? What if I don’t like this book?? I’m on vacation; I want my reading to be good!! Fortunately, although by no means a home run—by dint of Gould’s somewhat…

  3. Book cover for Fat Girl on a Plane

    Fat Girl on a Plane

    by Kelly deVos

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Arrrgh, I hate writing reviews like this because I never know what tone to take. It would be so much simpler if I just hated or just loved Fat Girl on a Plane, but the complicated truth is that I really liked this book and I think it’s really problematic. I loved it for the fashion but not so much the fat rep, which is never a phrase I thought I would utter. In…

  4. Book cover for Giant Days

    Giant Days

    by Non Pratt

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Having not read the graphic novels that started this series, I can’t compare them to Giant Days the novel. Nevertheless, the fingerprints of comic form are all over this book. By this I mean that Non Pratt manages to replicate the slight zaniness inherent in any comic universe, even one purporting to be as prosaic as a story about three people in university. This shouldn’t always work in the novel form (it’s why so many…

  5. Book cover for Let's Talk About Love

    Let's Talk About Love

    by Claire Kann

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Always excited to read a book with any kind of ace-spec rep. Let’s Talk About Love is in many ways your classic coming-of-age YA/NA tale of a protagonist discovering more about herself, her sexuality and romantic identity, and her relationships with her friends. Claire Kann doesn’t make it easy for Alice (or for the reader, for that part). This is a bumpy, uneven book, with parts that shine and parts that make me…

  6. Book cover for The Amateurs

    The Amateurs

    by Sara Shepard

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I picked this up from my library on a whim because it was on a display and I liked the description of the premise. I know nothing about Pretty Little Liars or Sara Shepard. The Amateurs has a great premise! Unfortunately, the writing, characterization, and even the plot fail to live up to the expectations I had.

    Seneca Frazier has spent most of her first year of college on a message board called Case Not…

  7. Book cover for Here We Are

    Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World

    by Kelly Jensen

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I suppose I should start with one of those disclaimers about how I received a free electronic copy of this from NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers. However, I also preordered two hard copies with my own money (OK, someone else’s money in gift card form) even before that request was approved. But why wait a whole three weeks when I could read it earlier than that? That’s how excited I am for Here We Are:

  8. Book cover for Steeplejack

    Steeplejack

    by A.J. Hartley

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh my god give me more of these books right damn now.

    I don’t normally do this, but can we just stop for a moment and look at this utterly gorgeous cover by Mike Heath? I was going to read Steeplejack from the description alone, but I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t the cover that caught my eye while I was browsing the New Books shelf. Everything about this cover is amazing. The…

  9. Book cover for Fangirl

    Fangirl

    by Rainbow Rowell

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I never wrote much fanfic. Or read much of it. I tried. I consider myself a “fan” of many things. But I don’t like playing in others’ universes that much. And when I do (such as when I do my chatroom-based Star Trek roleplaying every week), I make up my own characters. Nevertheless, I understand why people like Cath Avery of Fangirl are so fascinated with writing in worlds others created. Rainbow Rowell takes this…

  10. Book cover for Dreams of Gods and Monsters

    Dreams of Gods and Monsters

    by Laini Taylor

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Well, here we are. Dreams of Gods and Monsters, the third book in this delightful trilogy from Laini Taylor, was coincidentally published a few weeks before I discovered the first book, Daughter of Smoke and Bone, courtesy my landlady. Two months later and I’ve read all three books. There’s always something fun about binging on a series in short succession. It definitely creates momentum and allows one to keep the characters and their…

  11. Book cover for Days of Blood and Starlight

    Days of Blood and Starlight

    by Laini Taylor

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Laini Taylor introduced us to Karou, a blue-haired seventeen-year-old girl whose origins are far more fantastic than you could believe at first glance. She is a linchpin in a war between the angelic seraphim and the demonic chimarae of Eretz, a world parallel to Earth. At the end of the first book, Karou learns the secret behind her origins and abandons her on-again/off-again angelic lover Akiva to go…

  12. Book cover for Daughter of Smoke and Bone

    Daughter of Smoke and Bone

    by Laini Taylor

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have a soft spot for urban fantasy in which there is “another” world within our own world—Neverwhere comes to mind as a good example. I think it speaks to the reader in me; for someone who inhales escapist fiction, the prospect that any door could potentially be a portal to another place is just … intoxicating. Daughter of Smoke and Bone capitalizes on this idea. Karou is the human adopted daughter of a…