Books shelved under “Mythology Remix”

27 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Norse Mythology

    Norse Mythology

    by Neil Gaiman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    First of all, let’s be clear: Norse mythology is hella cool.

    In his introduction to Norse Mythology, Neil Gaiman echoes what draws me to it. Like him, I was entranced by the stories of the Norse gods from an early age. I remember vividly my elementary school library having this big, thick book on Norse mythology full of illustrations. When I went through my mythology phase, I tolerated the Greek gods and occasionally talked…

  2. Book cover for A Crown of Wishes

    A Crown of Wishes

    by Roshani Chokshi

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    There’s a clever tweet going around out there advocating for a moratorium on words like “throne” and “crown” in YA book titles, and I totally get why. A Crown of Wishes is one of those densely generic titles that does a terrible job at hinting about the contents of the book. In this particular case, it is at least appropriate, in that the book does feature both crowns (metaphorical and literal) and wishes (um ……

  3. Book cover for The Star-Touched Queen

    The Star-Touched Queen

    by Roshani Chokshi

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I often use the idea of stories that “grab” me, often elaborating on that by then saying they “don’t let go”. Sometimes, though, I should be talking about whether or not I was able to grab onto a story. Sometimes, as with The Star-Touched Queen, stories or parts of them elude me and leave me feeling dissatisfied, even if I’m not sure why.

    Roshani Chokshi delivers an Indian mythology–infused story of a princess doomed…

  4. Book cover for The Ghoul Vendetta

    The Ghoul Vendetta

    by Lisa Shearin

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Previously, on Kara’s reviews of THE SPI FILES…:

    … the intimations of bigger and better story arcs continue here. Once again we have a direct reference to the face-shifting ghoul terrorizing Ian. (According to the Goodreads series list, the next book is The Ghoul Vendetta, so I’m guessing we’ll soon get some pay-off on that arc!) …

    I was going to criticize the covers and complain about how they’re all different poses of

  5. Book cover for Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights

    Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights

    by Salman Rushdie

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights, Salman Rushdie combines the literary traditions from A Thousand and One Nights with aspects of Arabic mythology and a dash of our own fascination with apocalypses of the modern age. It is an entertaining novel in its own right, but I can’t help but feel like Rushdie has gone and pulled a John Irving on me and written something on repeat. All the old standbys are…

  6. Book cover for The Rose & the Dagger

    The Rose & the Dagger

    by Renée Ahdieh

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I couldn’t stay away from the sequel to The Wrath & the Dawn, and my library was quick to enable me with The Rose & the Dagger. The love story of Shahrzad and Khalid and the war it has provoked come to a swift conclusion here. Hold on to your bookmarks, folks, because Renée Ahdieh is not slowing down this magic carpet ride, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.

    First off:…

  7. Book cover for The Wrath and the Dawn

    The Wrath and the Dawn

    by Renée Ahdieh

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As I reflected in my review of The Sleeper and the Spindle, fairytale retellings are all the rage. With The Wrath & the Dawn, we have a new take on One Thousand and One Nights. Unlike the original, the stories within the frame story fall by the wayside, for the most part, as Shahrzad’s relationship with Khalid intensifies. Renée Ahdieh’s reimagining, then, is less about retelling the stories from One Thousand and

  8. Book cover for The Table of Less Valued Knights

    The Table of Less Valued Knights

    by Marie Phillips

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I'm always down for some historical/mythological fiction in a comedic style, so The Table of Less Valued Knights seemed like a good proposition. Marie Phillips delivers an Arthurian quest beset with archetypes, allusions, and anachronisms. Her characters quip like they're in a Christopher Moore novel (albeit slightly less self-aware) and her vision of Knights of Camelot is every bit as decadently absurd as Monty Python's.

    There. Have I name-dropped enough comparisons yet? Good. Let's get…

  9. Book cover for Out of Time

    Out of Time

    by D.G. Laderoute

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So you’re fourteen years old, and you’re on a vision quest. It’ll be another hundred years or so before Europeans show up and tell your people that, actually, Turtle Island is going to be called “North America” and was empty before they showed up. But I digress. You want to get a vision so you can become a man, but this stupid turtle just won’t shut up … ohhhhh.

    Meanwhile, you’re fourteen years old, and…

  10. Book cover for Odd and the Frost Giants

    Odd and the Frost Giants

    by Neil Gaiman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Using the word versatile to describe Neil Gaiman is a bit like using the word crooked to describe a politician or talented to describe the holder of a world record for most pies eaten in an hour. It just seems obvious.

    But think about it. Gaiman has written short stories and novels and all the lengths of fiction in between. He’s written comics/graphic novels. He writes for children and for adults, and picture books for…

  11. Book cover for Poison Fruit

    Poison Fruit

    by Jacqueline Carey

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Poison Fruit, like Autumn Bones, does not let much time elapse between books. The events of Halloween are still fresh in people’s minds as New Year approaches. Now Daisy has to get to the bottom of what the hell-spawn lawyer Daniel Dufreyne is doing buying up land around Little Niflheim. And she also needs to sort out her complicated feelings about her attractions to Stefan and Cody.

    I’ll start off with the romance…

  12. Book cover for Damned

    Damned

    by Chuck Palahniuk

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have to return this book to the library soon, because despite putting it on hold, it has another hold on it already. Already. This Chuck Palahniuk guy sure is popular. Yet I feel as if I should do my civic duty and put a sticky note inside this book that reads, “Don’t bother.” That’s pretty much my review of Damned, in two words.

    Madison Spencer is a thirteen-year-old girl, the daughter of rich-but-eccentric…

  13. Book cover for Dark Currents

    Dark Currents

    by Jacqueline Carey

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Dark Currents, the anticipated debut to Jacqueline Carey’s new urban fantasy series Agent of Hel, got my attention back when it first came out. I saw it on io9, added it to my to-read list.

    And promptly forgot about it.

    Because that’s what happens when you have a list so long that even if you stop adding books to it today, it will take you about four years to get through it.

    Fortunately,…

  14. Book cover for Blood and Iron

    Blood and Iron

    by Jon Sprunk

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Blood and Iron, not to be confused with the urban fantasy novel of the same name by Elizabeth Bear, is the first entry in a trilogy by Jon Sprunk about fantasy nations at war. Our hero is Horace, a shipwright and carpenter stranded on the shores of a hostile empire, at their mercy, who suddenly finds out he can do magic. What ensues in the slow self-destruction of the capital city of this kingdom…

  15. Book cover for The Thirteen Hallows

    The Thirteen Hallows

    by Michael Scott

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I probably shouldn’t have read this, considering how little time I had left to get through these library books. I probably should have skipped in favour of a book I was more confident I could enjoy. But I think I needed this—I needed something that’s just so bad I could sit back and bask in its badness for a bit. The Thirteen Hallows certainly satisfied me in that regard.

    All the warning signs are clearly…

  16. Book cover for Baudolino

    Baudolino

    by Umberto Eco

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So many stories are themselves about stories and storytelling. There is something about this basic act of creation and communication that captivates the human mind and spirit. Storytelling necessarily blurs the line between truth and falsehood; there is no way to relate any story, even history, with perfect truth, for we are all fallible and subjective beings. And history—that patchwork quilt of stories that make the grandest narrative of them all—is probably more lies than…

  17. Book cover for The Secret History of Moscow

    The Secret History of Moscow

    by Ekaterina Sedia

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t know a lot about Moscow, or even Russia in general. If I had more free time, I would devote some of it to feeling guilty for this gap in my knowledge. Some day I might even get around to rectifying it by reading some informative books on the subject, rather than fantasy (which, I’m given to understand, is not always 100% factual—odd, that). But not today! No, today I’ll talk about The Secret

  18. Book cover for The Damned Busters

    The Damned Busters

    by Matthew Hughes

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have a thing for demon-summoning.

    Wait, that didn’t come out right. I don’t have a thing for demon-summoning. As in, I don’t like summoning demons. Actually, I’ve never summoned a demon, but I imagine that if I did summon a demon, I wouldn’t much enjoy it. However, I suppose that there is a small chance that if I do, one day, summon a demon, then I might discover I enjoy it and start off…

  19. Book cover for Hell and Earth

    Hell and Earth

    by Elizabeth Bear

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So this appears to be the last book, at least for now, of Elizabeth Bear’s Promethean Age series. The series is actually two loose duologies: Blood and Iron and Whiskey and Water are set in the modern day; Ink and Steel and this book are part of the Stratford Man duology, set in a Faerie-infested Elizabethan England. As my previous reviews of books in this series make clear, I am incredibly ambivalent. Bear’s commitment to…

  20. Book cover for American Gods

    American Gods

    by Neil Gaiman

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Second Review (Finished December 10, 2010.)

    Oh, let me count and enumerate the many and various ways I love Neil Gaiman and, in particular, American Gods. I love it because I am insecure and, at times, unsure of my love for it. I love it because it isn't perfect, yet it's still wonderful. I love it because it promises gods and gives us people, and somewhere along the way, somehow, Gaiman manages to make…

  21. Book cover for And Another Thing...

    And Another Thing...

    by Eoin Colfer

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    There are some great moments in this book, moments worthy of quotation. There is tea; there are gods; there is Vogon bureaucracy and Vogon poetry. And Another Thing... sublimely embraces the h2g2 universe by grabbing hold of it by the scruff of its neck and shaking it vigorously until more characters and random plot events fall out.

    And I didn't like it.

    See, h2g2's humorous nexus of improbable events with zany characters is the icing…

  22. Book cover for The Palace of Illusions

    The Palace of Illusions

    by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Panchaali enters this world through a holy fire, an unwanted boon granted by the gods in addition to her brother, the child destined to kill their father's greatest enemy. She marries the five Pandava brothers, the eldest of whom bets and loses his kingdom to their cousin. After twelve years of exile in the forest, the cousin refuses to return the kingdom, and the Pandavas go to war against the Kauravas. It is a story…

  23. Book cover for Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bible!

    Ladies and Gentlemen, The Bible!

    by Jonathan Goldstein

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I love Bible stories. I have a vague memory of our family doctor's office, and how I would enjoy going there because there was a Children's Bible—or it might have just been the Old Testament—and I loved reading the story of Genesis from it. Of course, I was a child back then, and as my religious tendencies have gone from agnostic to atheistic, one might expect my enthusiasm for the Bible to dim. Quite the…

  24. Book cover for Norse Code

    Norse Code

    by Greg Van Eekhout

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The cover of Norse Code is misleading. It has a classic "urban fantasy" pose, the woman holding a phallic weapon and looking over her shoulder at the reader. Really, Norse Code is nothing like the cover or the description on the back of the book. Although it begins like other urban fantasy books, it quickly becomes something different. It is an epic tale focused through the lens of postmodern apocalypse, where metaphor becomes literal, and…

  25. Book cover for Ink and Steel

    Ink and Steel

    by Elizabeth Bear

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Why, why did Blood and Iron and Whiskey and Water precede this book?! Ink and Steel possesses the best qualities of its predecessors and few of their flaws. Elizabeth Bear's skill flourishes in an alternate Elizabethan England where Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare are agents for the Queen and have dealings with Fae.

    By far, my reviews of the previous books singled out an overly-complicated mythology as the Promethean Age's major flaw. Ink and Steel

  26. Book cover for Whiskey and Water

    Whiskey and Water

    by Elizabeth Bear

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Significantly better than the first book in this series, Whiskey and Water picks up the loose ends from Blood and Iron and sustains them through half the book, building to a much more satisfying climax consisting of multiple battles and tense magical standoffs. My gripe: why did I have to wait for book 2 for all that heavy worldbuilding to pay off?!

    As with its predecessor, Whiskey and Water suffers from a surfeit of mythology…

  27. Book cover for Lavinia

    Lavinia

    by Ursula K. Le Guin

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I respect Ursula K. Le Guin greatly, for although she tackles many difficult and controversial topics, she never beats you over the head with her opinions. Works like her The Left Hand of Darkness allow you to read an intriguing story while at the same time, if you want, open yourself to new ideas.

    Le Guin brings a feminist voice to the eponymous Lavinia, a character from Vergil's Aeneid. She tells Lavinia's story from…