Books shelved under “Time Travel”

49 reviews found

  1. Book cover for This Is How You Lose the Time War

    This Is How You Lose the Time War

    by Amal El-Mohtar & Max Gladstone

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Like so many time-travel stories, This Is How You Lose the Time War is frustratingly, endearingly, eerily beautiful. It takes a special kind of talent to write time travel well—you need not only that non-linear perspective that many writers find necessary even for linear plots, but you also require a certain level of sheer, Lewis Carroll-like madness to conceive of a multiverse so vastly alternative to our tiny slice, or strand. Amal El-Mohtar and Max…

  2. Book cover for Permafrost

    Permafrost

    by Alastair Reynolds

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Every single review panning this story for not making sense is entirely deserved. Time travel stories are difficult to write and, even when written well, difficult to parse and read. If it’s not your thing, that’s fine.

    But Permafrost is so very much my thing.

    In structure, it reminds me of Palimpsest, by Charles Stross. Both are novellas with a single protagonist recently initiated in time travel. Both are fairly convoluted in terms of…

  3. Book cover for The Quantum Garden

    The Quantum Garden

    by Derek Künsken

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Time travel stories are tricky. The best ones give me a headache but not too much of a headache. I guess it’s the literary equivalent of the adrenaline rush one gets from momentarily being upside down on a roller coaster (which is definitely not for me): I want my brain to hurt as I contemplate 4-, 11-, or 22-dimensional spacetime … but I don’t want to get so confused that I feel the author could…

  4. Book cover for Apocalypse How?

    Apocalypse How?

    by Galen Surlak-Ramsey

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I received this book from Tiny Fox Press and NetGalley in exchange for a review.

    Apocalypse How? is a messy trainwreck, and if that’s your style, you’ll probably enjoy it. For the rest of us … let’s just say that I kind of knew how I felt about this book less than 50 pages in, and maybe I should have stopped there. This is basically “Indiana Jones in space” but make Indiana a young woman…

  5. Book cover for The Walls Around Us

    The Walls Around Us

    by Nova Ren Suma

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Life is unfair. It’s even more unfair when you get tangled up with the justice system. One of the things that I’ve had to unlearn over my 29 years as a privileged white dude is my faith in the fairness and equity of the justice system. The Walls Around Us explores the cracks of the justice system from the perspective of youth, particularly young girls of colour. I was nearly tempted to give up on…

  6. Book cover for The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

    by Stuart Turton

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Time loops. An English country house murder mystery. Shifting identities and allegiances. Yes please. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle has so many things that attract me to a novel. For the most part, Stuart Turton’s execution kept me riveted: I inhaled this book over the course of two days, stopping only because I really did need to sleep.

    A man comes to consciousness in the middle of a forest. All he remembers is the…

  7. Book cover for The World According to Anna

    The World According to Anna

    by Jostein Gaarder

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Imagine you live in a world where a significant percentage of the population has a simple but necessary job: they sit in a booth, and every so often, a light comes on, and when it does, they push a button in front of them, and the light goes out. As long as they do that, all day every day, we have electricity and fuel and plastics and all these conveniences we rely on in our…

  8. Book cover for The Shining Girls

    The Shining Girls

    by Lauren Beukes

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Lauren Beukes writes haunting pieces of speculative fiction, and The Shining Girls is no exception. If you like serial killers, time travel, or investigative journalism, then this book is for you. I don’t normally read thrillers, serial killer stories, etc. That just isn’t my cup of tea. But I like Beukes; Broken Monsters is a fantastic work, and I was hoping for more of the same here. By and large I was satisfied, although certain…

  9. Book cover for How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

    How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe

    by Charles Yu

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Time travel: tricky stuff. Meta-fiction: tricky stuff. Combining time travel and meta-fiction? Extremely tricky stuff. Charles Yu’s How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe aims high by doing just this. I read it at a time when I was precisely in the mood for this kind of timey-wimey, universe-bending confusion of a narrative, so that was a point in its favour. And by and large I think Yu manages to pull it off,…

  10. Book cover for The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

    The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

    by Neal Stephenson

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To whoever finds this,

    I say unto you now thrice, look, this isn’t really a novel.

    Reader, I write this with the hope that, one day, we might be successful in undoing (redoing? doing? DOing?) what has already been undone. But if you are reading this and scratching your head, then perhaps all our efforts have come to naught.

    I believe that a concerted time-travel project (or “diachronic operation”) has been carried out, in…

  11. Book cover for The Continuum

    The Continuum

    by Wendy Nikel

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Loves me some time travel, so of course when I saw this on NetGalley, I jumped on it. Thanks NetGalley and World Weaver Press for the eARC. The Continuum is a quick jaunt, if you will, into both past and future. Wendy Nikel keeps us guessing with numerous twists and turns, though I wish I were more interested in both the protagonist and the overall plot.

    The Continuum opens with Elise Morley in 1912. She…

  12. Book cover for Back to Before

    Back to Before

    by K.A. Applegate

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It’s the last Megamorphs entry, and Back to Before closes this series-within-a-series with a bang. Pushed to the breaking point by yet another horrifically gruesome battle, Jake succumbs to the temptation presented by Crayak’s minion, the Drode. He agrees to let the Drode rewrite time so that Jake, Cassie, Marco, Rachel, and Tobias never walk through that construction site, never acquire morphing abilities, never meet Elfangor or Ax or learn about Yeerks. Yep, this is…

  13. Book cover for The Rise of Endymion

    The Rise of Endymion

    by Dan Simmons

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Over seven years and four books later, I have finished the Hyperion Cantos. What a journey. I’d be lying if I said I remembered much about the first three books at this point (that’s why I write reviews). I kept putting off reading The Rise of Endymion; it has been sitting in my to-read pile since I bought the last three books from the used book store. But Dan Simmons’ science fiction is…

  14. Book cover for Extracted

    Extracted

    by Sherry D. Ficklin

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Extracted was originally published a few years ago, but this edition is apparently “expanded” and contains “bonus material”. I don’t know about that, but I do know that I had never heard of this series until now, and that makes me sad. I’m glad that I got a copy of this to review through NetGalley, because Sherry D. Ficklin and Tyler Jolley have written some fun and original time travel here.

    The setup is easy…

  15. Book cover for Elfangor's Secret

    Elfangor's Secret

    by K.A. Applegate

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It’s another Megamorphs, and more time travel! This time it’s not the Ellimist who sends them back but Crayak, of all entities, via the Drode, because a Yeerk got its hands on the Time Matrix, and ain’t nobody wants that. Of course, Crayak has a “price” to enlisting the Animorphs: one of them must die!

    This book is dark in a way few of the previous Animorphs books have been. And its darkness…

  16. Book cover for The Wheel of Ice

    The Wheel of Ice

    by Stephen Baxter

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I am just as surprised as you are that I’m reading another Doctor Who novel! As I explained when I reviewed Engines of War, media tie-ins are not my thing. Especially for something as iconic as Doctor Who, I need the actors to pull off that characterization. Maybe I should check out the audio plays—I think I would genuinely enjoy those. So what compelled me to pick this up when I spied it…

  17. Book cover for Replay

    Replay

    by Ken Grimwood

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    For the first time in a while, I actually regret sticking out this book instead of DNF-ing it. It was bad. Just as I was starting to lose all hope, there was a glimmer a couple of hours in that made me hang on a bit longer. And then I figured I might as well finish the whole thing just to learn why Jeff keeps replaying parts of his life. Because when you get right…

  18. Book cover for Out of Time

    Out of Time

    by D.G. Laderoute

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So you’re fourteen years old, and you’re on a vision quest. It’ll be another hundred years or so before Europeans show up and tell your people that, actually, Turtle Island is going to be called “North America” and was empty before they showed up. But I digress. You want to get a vision so you can become a man, but this stupid turtle just won’t shut up … ohhhhh.

    Meanwhile, you’re fourteen years old, and…

  19. Book cover for In the Time of Dinosaurs

    In the Time of Dinosaurs

    by K.A. Applegate

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I want to say that I don’t remember these books being as dark as they seem now, but I think that would be a lie. Young!Kara recognized the darkness—but for me, at that age, that wasn’t even the draw. I was more about the adventure and the heroism of these young characters—the science-fictional elements were really the coolest thing. Now when I read Megamorphs #2: In the Time of the Dinosaurs I’m focusing more on…

  20. Book cover for Winter's Dawn, Season's End

    Winter's Dawn, Season's End

    by Tony Lee

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Unlike the majority of the other reviews on Goodreads for this book, I did not receive this as a NetGalley preview, so I did read 400 pages of adventure following the Tenth Doctor and the mysterious adversary the Advocate. As with my recent experience with a tie-in novel, I don’t ordinarily go for tie-in graphic novels. This was, again, a Christmas present.

    I enjoyed Winter’s Dawn, Season’s End more than Engines of War. Maybe…

  21. Book cover for Doctor Who

    Doctor Who: Engines of War

    by George Mann

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Let’s begin with a disclaimer that I read this because my dad gave it to me as a Christmas gift. I don’t, generally, read media tie-in novels—or comics. Despite my abiding desire to continue Buffy or Farscape, I just can’t do it. I read—and greatly enjoyed—many of the Star Trek novels when I was a child. Nevertheless, I find that the actors bring something to their portrayal of a character that not even the…

  22. Book cover for The Andalite Chronicles

    The Andalite Chronicles

    by K.A. Applegate

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So … yeah. This book made me cry, at the end.

    I remember reading the hard copy version of this as a kid and marvelling at how much thicker it was than your typical Animorphs novel. Don’t get me wrong—by that age I was already mainlining The Lord of the Rings and Dune, so I was already acquainted with long novels. Until now, though, Applegate had intentionally been keeping her stories not just short,

  23. Book cover for Pivot Point

    Pivot Point

    by Kasie West

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Addison Coleman, or Addie, is a mutant Tomorrow Person—damn it, she’s got mind powers, mmkay? But not floaty-move-stuff-with-your-mind powers—that’s Telekinetics—or memory-erasing powers—that’s Erasing—she can see the two possible paths that branch from a choice she has to make—Discerning, or Divergence, or whatever. The names aren’t that important. This is the Tomorrow People if the Tomorrow People were led by adults and not afraid for their lives because they’re all safe in a Compound in…

  24. Book cover for The Forgotten

    The Forgotten

    by K.A. Applegate

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It’s time … to travel … in time.

    Animorphs played with time travel once before, in #7: The Stranger, but that was at the hands of the Ellimist. This time, the Animorphs accidentally create a Sario Rip—technobabble for “hole in space-time,” which is technobabble for … well … you know … stuff—when the Dracon beams they fired from a stolen Bug fighter intersected with the Dracon beams from Visser Three’s Blade ship, and—

    —what?…

  25. Book cover for Proxima

    Proxima

    by Stephen Baxter

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I seem to remember reading some or all of Stephen Baxter’s Manifold books when I was much younger. Those also involved a future sentience/intelligence at the end of the universe reaching back in the history of the universe to alter events through weird, inexplicable phenomena. So I guess this is a thing for him. Proxima starts its life as a straightforward tale of enforced penal colonization of another planet before gradually sprawling into a parallel…

  26. Book cover for The Diamond Conspiracy

    The Diamond Conspiracy

    by Pip Ballantine

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I discovered this on my library’s new paperbacks shelf last week and literally squealed aloud. I have a warped perspective of this series’ publication structure because I’ve read the first three books in short succession to get caught up, so I had forgotten The Diamond Conspiracy was coming out so “soon” after I read Dawn’s Early Light.

    A lot was riding on this book. With the disavowal of the Ministry of Peculiar Occurrences at…

  27. Book cover for The Stranger

    The Stranger

    by K.A. Applegate

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Marco finds the location of the main Yeerk pool. (It’s underneath the Gap, guys! We don’t have a Gap in Thunder Bay any more. But I remember when we had one—in the nineties.) It’s too difficult to destroy the pool, but if they can find the Kandrona that emits the rays the Yeerks need to live, then they can deal a serious blow to the Yeerks. Don’t worry, the Animorphs have a plan ……

  28. Book cover for The Forever War

    The Forever War

    by Joe Haldeman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So I’m on a relativistic shuttle, waiting for you…. I never found anybody else and I don’t want anybody else. I don’t care whether you’re ninety years old or thirty. If I can’t be your lover, I’ll be your nurse.

    Hey kids, you know how people keep using that word allegory, and you’re never really sure what they mean, and they probably aren’t even sure what they mean?

    This. This is an allegory.

    If…

  29. Book cover for Endymion

    Endymion

    by Dan Simmons

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Centuries after the events of The Fall of Hyperion, and three and a half years after I read that book, Endymion takes place and I read it. I had actually forgotten that there was a book between this one and Hyperion; I described this as the second book in a series when friends asked me what I was reading. Oops! And it has been so long since I read the first two that…

  30. Book cover for Making History

    Making History

    by Stephen Fry

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So you invent a time machine, and what’s the first thing you do? You go back in time and kill Hitler, of course! Except you can’t (TVTropes), because either it doesn’t work or it screws up the timeline even more. Thus resolving one of the burning questions surrounding time travel: if it’s possible, why do we still have Hitler? Stephen Fry tackles this in a best-of-all-possible worlds way in Making History, where his protagonist…

  31. Book cover for Time Safari

    Time Safari

    by David Drake

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I mean, really. It’s called Time Safari. Do I really have to explain it to you? It’s “A Sound of Thunder” but without the butterfly and with more sexual tension.

    At some point in the future, the Israeli government has developed time travel. With a margin of error plus or minus 5000 years, it is useless for rewriting the recent past, but hunting expeditions to the Cretaceous provide a useful source of funding for…

  32. Book cover for Doctor Who

    Doctor Who: Eleven Doctors, Eleven Stories

    by Eoin Colfer

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The librarians at my school alerted me to this book. I knew Neil Gaiman had written a special short story, “Nothing O’Clock”, for the 50th anniversary, but I hadn’t been particularly bothered about finding it. Aside from the fact that I tend not to read fan fiction, the state of ebooks these days is still deplorable enough that finding a non-DRM copy would probably have been tricky.

    Luckily, I was clever and made sure I’m…

  33. Book cover for Shada

    Shada

    by Gareth Roberts

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t often read novels set in my favourite television or cinematic universe any more. I have fond memories of when I was much younger, and I had the time and freedom to virtually camp out in the library, of borrowing whatever Star Trek novels they happened to have available that day. After I became more comfortable with original SF and fantasy, I started to shy away from media tie-in novels. As I grew up…

  34. Book cover for Roads Not Taken

    Roads Not Taken: Tales of Alternate History

    by Gardner Dozois

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Not that long ago, I sampled another anthology of alternate history, Other Earths. Now I’m dipping into this specialized sub-genre again with Roads Not Taken. The premise is similar, but in this case the stories were all previously published in either Analog or Amazing. Though I’m disappointed that not one of the ten contributors is a woman, the stories themselves are much more thoughtful and interesting than those I encountered in Other

  35. Book cover for After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall

    After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall

    by Nancy Kress

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Nancy Kress has fast become one of my favourite science fiction authors. Like most authors I’m a fan of, her works don’t always make it on my favourites list, but they always make me think. Kress often explores how technology affects humanity’s relationship with nature and our own biology. She continues to play with these themes in After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall while adding in an ineffable alien menace and the…

  36. Book cover for In the Garden of Iden

    In the Garden of Iden

    by Kage Baker

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Time travel poses a host of complications, no matter which set of rules one follows. Plus, I mean, as cool as it might be to pop back to ancient Egypt or Rome or Tudor England for afternoon tea, I wouldn’t want to live there. Hello, indoor plumbing much? Flush toilets and high speed Internet? I like my “modern” conveniences, and I can understand why the first employees of the Company didn’t enjoy their duties much.…

  37. Book cover for The Man Who Ended History

    The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary

    by Ken Liu

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So we can’t go back in time—but what if we could see back in time? Glimpsing the past is almost as common as stories involving actual time travel. In The Man Who Ended History, however, Ken Liu puts a very intimate and emotional twist on reliving and remembering the atrocities of war. Coupled with the archaeological premise that these observational trips to the past are always a one-time affair—each act of observation destroys the…

  38. Book cover for The Revisionists

    The Revisionists

    by Thomas Mullen

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Time travel is a very broad trope in science fiction. There are so many stories to tell using time travel and so many ways of doing it. I love time travel stories (particularly Doctor Who), the nitty-gritty, wibbly-wobbley, timey-wimey type of stories that can leave you utterly confused and gasping for breath by the end. For all their intricate potentialities, however, time travel is really only good for two things: observing history, and fucking…

  39. Book cover for Slaughterhouse-Five

    Slaughterhouse-Five

    by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have often lamented our slavery to linear time. It is a peculiar form of universal injustice, this fact that we can never revisit moments once they become “the past”, that the present is continuously slipping through our hands and solidifying into something we cannot change, except through the careful or careless manipulations of memory and history. What would lives be like if we could experience every moment simultaneously? What if we were conscious of…

  40. Book cover for The Child in Time

    The Child in Time

    by Ian McEwan

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Childhood is magical.

    There is a myth, or at least a misconception, that this is a result of children being innocent. If you have ever been a child, then if you look deep into your heart, you will recognize this as the lie we tell ourselves to conceal the painful truth. Childhood is magical because it is inaccessible. Once gone, it can never be reclaimed, revisited, redone. It is lost to us except through the…

  41. Book cover for The Time Traveler's Wife

    The Time Traveler's Wife

    by Audrey Niffenegger

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Contrary to what the title of this book implies to any sensible reader, this book is not about River Song. Disappointing, I know.

    I ended up liking this book much more than I expected. To be perfectly honest, I did not want to like The Time Traveler’s Wife. It’s a popular book, a “pop lit” book that has appropriated something so dear to science fiction and turned it into a gimmick for a romance.…

  42. Book cover for Palimpsest

    Palimpsest

    by Charles Stross

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So after finishing The Time Traveler’s Wife I realized that the next book on my shelf was Family Matters. The last Rohinton Mistry book I read cut me up, so I decided that before I attempted this next one, I would need something I was guaranteed to enjoy. Fortunately, my awesome limited edition of Palimpsest had just arrived from Subterranean Press. I first read Palimpsest when it was a nominee for the Hugo Award…

  43. Book cover for Journeys

    Journeys

    by Ian R. MacLeod

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have never before read anything by Ian R. MacLeod. I have a terrible and impoverishing addiction to purchasing titles from specialty publisher Subterranean Press, and during an all-too-common binge (this time it was Charles Stross titles), I saw this on offer, shrugged, said, "What the hell?" and added it to my cart.

    I don't recall hearing much about Ian R. MacLeod either. His name is almost criminally similar to Ian McDonald, however, whose

  44. Book cover for All Clear

    All Clear

    by Connie Willis

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last time, on Kara's reviews:

    … there's a very palpable, somewhat ironic fear here, because in a way these three are more frightened of the Blitz than the stalwart contemporaries (or "contemps" as the historians call them).… So for a moment, there's a justifiable and interesting suspense. Unfortunately, Willis attempts to sustain that suspense entirely too long…

    all the characters in this book are ninnies … They complain about the retrieval team not

  45. Book cover for Troika

    Troika

    by Alastair Reynolds

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last week, Atlantis lifted off for the final space shuttle mission ever. The space shuttle program is older than I am, and to be honest, it's overdue for retirement. The Challenger and Columbia tragedies underscored how cantankerous and dangerous this method of low-Earth orbital delivery can be. The numerous delays in the final flights of Discovery and Atlantis emphasized the fragility of the aging shuttle fleet. So we should not be mourning the loss of…

  46. Book cover for Dhalgren

    Dhalgren

    by Samuel R. Delany

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I tend to read books one at a time in quick succession. I have to, for the same reason I am so assiduous in writing reviews: I have a poor memory for these types of details. However, every so often I'll have a "project" book that takes me weeks or months to read, in parallel with my other books. I tend to do this with lengthy anthologies; I've been doing it with the Iliad.…

  47. Book cover for Galileo's Dream

    Galileo's Dream

    by Kim Stanley Robinson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    There is a theory that views all of history as the result of actions by individuals at pivotal moments. These "Great Men" (or, let's be fair, "Great People") are the movers and shakers of historical periods. Leaders like Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, Elizabeth II, and Napoleon Bonaparte shaped society. Scientists like Sir Francis Bacon, Sir Isaac Newton, and yes, Galileo Galilei shaped our perception of the world. These are the people whose mark…

  48. Book cover for Woman on the Edge of Time

    Woman on the Edge of Time

    by Marge Piercy

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I'm ambivalent about this book. The best way to describe my reservation with Woman on the Edge of Time is that I was never comfortable suspending my disbelief. I tried to make myself willing to go where Marge Piercy was taking me but never quite got there. Although the book steadily improved from its chaotic but very dull beginning, it never involved me in the way I require to get much satisfaction from reading. In…

  49. Book cover for The Time Machine

    The Time Machine

    by H.G. Wells

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Maybe it's unfair to compare them, but having read this hot on the heels of The War of the Worlds, I liked The Time Machine better. On thematic grounds it's a close battle, but The Time Machine is a far superior story, hands down.

    I'm not even going to touch the whole "time travel" concept as Wells presents it in this book, both because it was written in 1895 and because science fiction has…