Books shelved under “History”

88 reviews found

  1. Book cover for King Leopold's Ghost

    King Leopold's Ghost

    by Adam Hochschild

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As someone who is interested in the history of colonialism, I was very intrigued when I learned of this book about the Belgian exploitation of Congo—or should I say, King Leopold's exploitation? For indeed, it’s one thing to read about British or French colonization elsewhere, or to hear the famous phrase “Scramble for Africa,” and another entirely to be reminded that the creation, colonization, and exploitation of Congo and the peoples therein was initially…

  2. Book cover for Finding Zero

    Finding Zero: A Mathematician's Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers

    by Amir D. Aczel

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The origins of our numbers, of our decimal place value system, of our numerals, is certainly an interesting topic! After all, we take for granted that we write numbers the way we do today—most of us learned Roman numerals as kids and quickly realize they are clunky and formidable as we try to write the year we were born (although anyone born after 2000 has a much easier time of it now!). But Amir Aczel…

  3. Book cover for Lost Feast

    Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food

    by Lenore Newman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The concept of culinary extinction came to my attention late last year, and it was one of those very intriguing, “Oh, yeah, I want to know more abou that” moments. I listened to Lenore Newman on an interview with Quirks & Quarks, and I also added Rob Dunn’s Never Out of Season to my to-read list at the same time (my library just happened to have this book and not Dunn’s, so I’m reading…

  4. Book cover for Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty

    Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty: 1685-1715

    by Julian Whitehead

    Unrated

    Reviewed

    I can’t do it. Why do I have such bad luck with non-fiction British history on NetGalley? First The Tragic Daughters of Charles I and now Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty. Thanks to NetGalley and publisher Pen and Sword History for the eARC, but unfortunately, I did not finish this book.

    Here’s what I was anticipating based on the description of the book: I was hoping that Julian Whitehead would explain,…

  5. Book cover for To Explain the World

    To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science

    by Steven Weinberg

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To Explain the World has been waiting for me on my shelf for a few years. The trouble with these vast, sweeping histories of science is that, as much as I love them, more acute pop science and pop history books always take priority. You want to teach me about vaccines? You want to talk to me about environmental racism? Hell yeah, I’m down. But unless you’re Bill Bryson, your hot take…

  6. Book cover for How to Hide an Empire

    How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States

    by Daniel Immerwahr

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I heard about this book on Twitter, I think, and read an excerpt (basically the introduction of the book) in The Guardian, and I was immediately sold. These days I read history books because I’ve discovered since leaving school that history is actually really, really difficult to learn. There’s just so much of it, and it’s just so subject to interpretation depending on the evidence available, the lens you use for that evidence, and…

  7. Book cover for The Sleeping Giant Awakens

    The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation

    by David B. MacDonald

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I live in Thunder Bay, the place of the eponymous sleeping giant, Nanabozho, and a location steeped in anti-Indigenous racism and an ongoing legacy of colonial oppression. So, despite being a white settler and thus the privileged party here, I do have to deal with these issues—and like other settler Canadians, I’ve got a tremendous responsibility here. I picked up The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation because…

  8. Book cover for The Glass Universe

    The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars

    by Dava Sobel

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Dava Sobel does it again.

    I love learning about science, but you know what I might love even more? Learning how we know what we know about science. Take the stars, for example. How do we know what they're made of without ever visiting them? How can we possibly know how big, or massive, or far away, or hot they are? The fact we've managed to deduce such knowledge from the surface of this planet…

  9. Book cover for Palimpsest

    Palimpsest: A History of the Written Word

    by Matthew Battles

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh boy, I should have checked out the Goodreads rating and reviews before buying this one. But I couldn’t resist! It was on sale at Chapters, and a whole book that seems to be about the history of writing? Sure, I flipped through the first few pages and detected a slightly pretentious tone—but I just thought it meant the author was very passionate and serious about their topic! I was seduced, I say! Seduced!

    Palimpsest:

  10. Book cover for The Impeachers

    The Impeachers: The Trial of Andrew Johnson and the Dream of a Just Nation

    by Brenda Wineapple

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I grew up in the ’90s, and I vaguely remember on TV when I was a kid some kind of scandal involving this guy named Bill Clinton, whom I knew as the President of the United States. The word impeachment kept getting thrown around, but of course I didn’t really know what that meant. Fast-forward 20 years, and the word has resurfaced as a possible fate for the current President, Donald Trump—and this time, I…

  11. Book cover for The Tragic Daughters of Charles I

    The Tragic Daughters of Charles I: Mary, Elizabeth & Henrietta Anne

    by Sarah-Beth Watkins

    Unrated

    Reviewed

    Reader, I finished the first chapter but could not go any further. The writing (or maybe copyediting) of this book is atrocious.

    I know that in this day and age commas are misunderstood beasts of punctuation. As someone very invested in eradicating comma splices from my students’ writing, I tend to lean on the side of using fewer commas when in doubt. Yet this book takes that position to the extreme. The result are torturous…

  12. Book cover for Sapiens

    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’ve had Homo Deus, Yuval Noah Harari’s later book, sitting in a box waiting to be read for a couple of years now (because that’s how I roll). My bestie Amanda recently purchased Sapiens on the strength of several recommendations, with someone even suggesting she could use it as a university course textbook. However, she is neck-deep in writing a PhD thesis right now, so I’m subbing in! I do loves me some world…

  13. Book cover for For God, Country, and Coca-Cola

    For God, Country, and Coca-Cola: The Definitive History of the Great American Soft Drink and the Company That Makes It

    by Mark Pendergrast

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So one day I was looking for some advertisements I could use with my English classes to discuss graphic texts and advertising strategies. I stumbled across Vintage Ad Browser's repository of Coca-Cola advertisements, and I was just captivated. It had never occurred to me before that Coca-Cola provides a perfect opportunity to chart the evolution of advertising over the course of more than a century. I pulled many ads through the decades to use with…

  14. Book cover for The Quantum Labyrinth

    The Quantum Labyrinth: How Richard Feynman and John Wheeler Revolutionized Time and Reality

    by Paul Halpern

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The Quantum Labyrinth: How Richard Feynman and John Wheeler Revolutionized Time and Reality is a history book masquerading as a physics book, and I like that. I’m just as interested in the history of science as I am in science itself. As the title implies, Paul Halpern focuses on the lives of Feynman and Wheeler, protégés who individually and collectively had their fingers on the pulse of physics for much of the twentieth century. Halpern…

  15. Book cover for All Our Relations

    All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward

    by Tanya Talaga

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    One year ago I read Tanya Talaga’s Seven Fallen Feathers, in which she remembers the seven Indigenous youths who died far from home while attending Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School here in Thunder Bay. In that heartbreaking and essential work, she links these deaths to a structure of colonialism and white supremacy and an ongoing form of cultural genocide in which the government and the rest of us remain complicit. Now Talaga is back…

  16. Book cover for Broad Band

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet

    by Claire L. Evans

    5 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Every so often, you read a non-fiction book that just speaks to you, that sticks with you because it’s not just informative but because it fits your level of background knowledge and expands your understanding of a topic perfectly. Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet is such a book for me. Claire L. Evans traces the development of the modern Internet from its precursors, the earliest mechanical and electronic…

  17. Book cover for How Music Got Free

    How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, the Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Piracy

    by Stephen Richard Witt

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, the Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Piracy was published in 2015, and I was a little worried that being three years old would already render it obsolete. Fortunately, I was wrong. Stephen Witt’s explanation of the rise of mp3 and the transition from CDs to digital stores to streaming, along with the corresponding piracy, is clear and detailed and incredibly fascinating. This…

  18. Book cover for The Rude Story of English

    The Rude Story of English

    by Tom Howell

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Well, this is definitely a story. About English. And it is very rude (lots of swearing, archaic and present-day). So in that sense, I suppose Tom Howell delivers exactly what is promised by the title The Rude Story of English.

    I really hesitate to call this a work of non-fiction. Oh, there are facts in here. But Howell is very careful to hide them amongst a quite frankly impressive cornucopia of tall tales and…

  19. Book cover for Command and Control

    Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

    by Eric Schlosser

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This was a birthday gift, along with A Criminal Magic, from my friend Amanda, and I’m just now getting to it—which, especially when it comes to my non-fiction backlog, isn’t actually that bad of a delay! Amanda was just getting to know me at the time, so she picked two books off my to-read list. I’m not sure why I had Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

  20. Book cover for The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    by Rebecca Skloot

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Our science teachers do a remarkable job with what limited resources, time, and support they have in school today. However, one of the many areas in which public science education could be improved is the way in which we examine the hidden systems that power science itself, and the way these systems intersect with our society. Cell lines are a great example of this. We learn about biomedical research in school, about cells, about vaccines—but…

  21. Book cover for Female Chauvinist Pigs

    Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

    by Ariel Levy

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Although I’ve been familiar with the concept for a while, I think I first came across the term Female Chauvinist Pig in Holly Bourne’s excellent How Hard Can Love Be?. In her novel, Bourne presents us with Melody, a stereotypical busty blonde who struts her stuff and embraces her sexuality and “hotness” because she believes that this is what makes her empowered in today’s society. It’s such an intriguing concept, something that interests me…

  22. Book cover for Sophie's World

    Sophie's World

    by Jostein Gaarder

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Hard to know what I could add to my previous review of Sophie’s World. I suppose in the 6 years that have passed since that second reading I have grown and changed and that means my perspective on this book will have changed as well. But I stand by the earlier review, and now I’ll just elaborate.

    I bought this fresh copy of Sophie’s World as a gift; actually, I bought it twice over.…

  23. Book cover for The Spinning Magnet

    The Spinning Magnet: The Force That Created the Modern World--and Could Destroy It

    by Alanna Mitchell

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    One of my most favourite episodes of the new Cosmos (because, honestly, they are all so good) is Episode 10: “The Electric Boy”, which focuses on the life and discoveries of Michael Faraday. In particular, the episode emphasizes how the invention of the dynamo and the electric motor spurred on a whole new technological revolution. The electric motor is just ubiquitous now, even more so than smarter digital electronics, and we take it for granted…

  24. Book cover for Residential Schools and Reconciliation

    Residential Schools and Reconciliation: Canada Confronts Its History

    by J.R. Miller

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As Canada celebrated its 150th birthday this year, reconciliation was increasingly a buzzword on the lips of politicians, journalists, and celebrities. Most people seemed to recognize that we have a ways to go in our relationship with Indigenous peoples—but most people also seem unwilling to put that recognition into action. As my recent review of Seven Fallen Feathers shows, our country is still a hostile place when it comes to Indigenous lives. And the present…

  25. Book cover for 1517

    1517: Martin Luther and the Invention of the Reformation

    by Peter Marshall

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    First of all, can we agree that it should be “95” or “ninety-five” but never “ninetyfive”, like WTF.

    Distinctly weird hyphenation aside, 1517: Martin Luther and the Invention of the Reformation, is a thoughtful examination of one of those well-celebrated yet mythologized moments in history. Peter Marshall uses the stories surrounding Luther’s apocryphal posting of the 95 theses to examine the character of the Reformation in Luther’s time, his legacy and effects on the…

  26. Book cover for The Future of War

    The Future of War: A History

    by Lawrence Freedman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Not actually my cup of tea, The Future of War: A History is a massive data dump and analysis of what we used to think about the future of warfare. Lawrence Freedman has clearly Done the Research, and I have to hand it to him: there’s compelling stuff here. Thanks to NetGalley and Public Affairs for the eARC.

    I love the premise of this book. It kind of merges my passion for literature and my…

  27. Book cover for A History of Canada in Ten Maps

    A History of Canada in Ten Maps: Epic Stories of Charting a Mysterious Land

    by Adam Shoalts

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So … this is a proof copy from the publisher via NetGalley (tanks), and I have to just put it out there that I didn’t actually see any maps in this version. I don’t know if that’s by design or simply that they hadn’t been set into the book at the type this version was exported. It seems a little silly to me that a book called A History of Canada in Ten Maps does…

  28. Book cover for Bad Girls from History

    Bad Girls from History: Wicked or Misunderstood?

    by Dee Gordon

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is one of those tough books to rate and review, because anything I say is going to feel too harsh. Bad Girls from History is not a bad book by any means; I think there is a sizable audience out there for whom this could be an interesting and informative read. I’m just not a member of that audience. Dee Gordon’s dive into presenting 100 women who misbehaved is a little too encylopaedic, a…

  29. Book cover for Jane's Fame

    Jane's Fame: How Jane Austen Conquered the World

    by Claire Harman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Yeah, my dad bought me two books about Jane Austen a few birthdays ago, and I figured I should read them back-to-back so I could compare them. The other was A Brief Guide to Jane Austen. This one, Jane’s Fame: How Jane Austen Conquered the World is much less a biography or analysis of her individual novels and much more an examination of how Austen went from moderately successful author in her time to…

  30. Book cover for A Brief Guide to Jane Austen

    A Brief Guide to Jane Austen

    by Charles Jennings

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It has been over six years since I last read and reviewed an Austen novel, and nearly as long since I received A Brief Guide to Jane Austen: The Life and Times of the World’s Favourite Author as a birthday gift, along with another Austen biography-like book that I’ll review shortly. Charles Jennings tackles his task with four parts: the actual life of Austen, her novels, life in Regency England, and then life…

  31. Book cover for The Radium Girls

    The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women

    by Kate Moore

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This book makes one uncomfortable from the very start. Moore lists the ways in which American society embraced the use of radium at the turn of the century. They put it on and in practically everything. It glowed in the dark, after all! It was miraculous! Moore’s blithe list is just so jarring to a 21st-century reader who is aware of radioactivity and the dangers of radium. Yet it’s an effective way to establish the…

  32. Book cover for The Vaccine Race

    The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease

    by Meredith Wadman

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is what I knew about vaccines prior to reading this book:

    • Vaccines work by delivering a killed or live, but weakened, version of a virus into the body, stimulating the body’s immune system into producing antibodies without actually causing an infection.
    • Edward Jenner gets a lot of credit for using cowpox to vaccinate against smallpox, though he wasn’t the first to think about this.
    • Vaccines are responsible for preventing death, disability, and disfigurement due
  33. Book cover for Hidden Figures

    Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race

    by Margot Lee Shetterly

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    No, but seriously, did you expect anything less of a rating from me? This book is kickass. It is literally everything I have wanted in a science history book for a while.

    Hidden Figures details the lives and achievements of the Black women who worked first as computers, then as mathematicians and engineers, for NACA (the National Advisory Committee of Aeronautics) and its successor, NASA. Margot Lee Shetterly pulls back the curtain on an aspect…

  34. Book cover for Marie Antoinette's Darkest Days

    Marie Antoinette's Darkest Days: Prisoner No. 280 in the Conciergerie

    by Will Bashor

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It’s entirely a coincidence that I read about Marie Antoinette in Trainwreck just prior to picking up Marie Antoinette’s Darkest Days. That being said, it was nice to have a little primer from Sady Doyle about why Antoinette is such a fascinating character from a feminist perspective. Here, Will Bashor pieces together Antoinette’s experiences while imprisoned in the Conciergerie prior to her trial and execution. He draws upon a wealth of primary sources in…

  35. Book cover for Haters

    Haters: Harassment, Abuse, and Violence Online

    by Bailey Poland

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh man, I did not pick the right time to start reading Haters: Harassment, Abuse, and Violence Online (yay Oxford comma!). I started this two days before the American Election Day, and then after those results, I just had to kind of … put it down a bit. I was planning to read it over a week or so, because like Indigenous Writes, this is an academic-but-accessible book about some heavy stuff, and reading…

  36. Book cover for Timekeepers

    Timekeepers: How the World Became Obsessed With Time

    by Simon Garfield

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I spend a lot of time (hah) thinking about how little we understand the way people in the past actually lived, day to day, simply because technology that we now take for granted has changed things we don’t even think about. I take it for granted that I can know the precise time, as we currently measure it, all the time. I take it for granted that I can flick a switch and have light…

  37. Book cover for A Little Gay History

    A Little Gay History: Desire and Diversity Around the World

    by R.B. Parkinson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I hate listicles. I’ve gotten to the point where I just don’t click on any post that starts with a number in its title. I know, I know, #notalllisticles, some are well-written and informative.

    A Little Gay History is, when you think about it, a listicle; you could retitle it “82 Objects from the British Museum Related to Gay Sexual Desire”. Listicles were around before the Internet, and I suppose they will outlive the Internet…

  38. Book cover for Empire

    Empire: The Rise and Demise of the British World Order and the Lessons for Global Power

    by Niall Ferguson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You know what makes counterfactual fiction work? It’s fiction. Counterfactual history is just an exercise bound to end in tears.

    So many histories of the British Empire, and with good reason—it was, in its time, quite a big deal. Many histories of the UK focus on the British Isles, on the monarchs and shenanigans happening in the succession. And that’s all very fascinating, but it’s not what Niall Ferguson wants to talk about here.

  39. Book cover for Spinster

    Spinster: Making a Life of One's Own

    by Kate Bolick

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I read most, if not all, of the Anne of Green Gables books as a kid (of course). I was very moved by Anne’s journey and transition to adulthood; even then, I was pretty sure I wanted to be a teacher, and so I was fascinated by her career path. While the details of the story have blurred with time, one memory continues to stick with me. In none book, Anne and a friend are…

  40. Book cover for The Island at the Center of the World

    The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America

    by Russell Shorto

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You have no idea how hard it is for me to spell this title “correctly” (with the American spelling of centre). I have the forbearance of a saint, I swear.

    The Island at the Center of the World is about the Dutch colony on Manhattan Island—New Amsterdam and its ancillary towns that would eventually be surrendered to the English and metamorphose into New York and New York state. Russell Shorto wants to bring to…

  41. Book cover for The Measure of All Things

    The Measure of All Things: The Seven-Year Odyssey and Hidden Error That Transformed the World

    by Ken Alder

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    After a long spate of young adult novels, and in particular the very harrowing Asking for It, I needed a palate-cleanser. How much further can we get than a book about the expedition to define the metre?

    I take the metre for granted. It’s just there. I was aware, vaguely, of the various ways in which it has been defined, and I knew that the metric system came out of the French Revolution.…

  42. Book cover for Undeniable

    Undeniable: Evolution and the Science of Creation

    by Bill Nye

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So let’s say you’re unsure on this whole evolution thing. You’ve got questions. But, for one reason or another, science never stuck with you in school. Maybe your classes (or teachers, sigh) were a bit on the boring side—lots of memorization and dull textbooks, and no explosions, no episodes of Bill Nye the Science Guy on VHS on the bulky 27" CRT television wheeled out from the A/V cabinet (ahhh, those were the days). Or…

  43. Book cover for The Inconvenient Indian

    The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America

    by Thomas King

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Just last week, CBC News announced it was closing comments on articles about indigenous peoples, because at the moment, it cannot guarantee sufficient moderation to sustain polite discourse. In addition to the usual trolls, some people were writing hate speech motivated by a misconception of the state of indigenous peoples in Canada. And while this is reprehensible, it probably shouldn’t be surprising. We white people are very good at ignoring indigenous people—until we want their…

  44. Book cover for Life Inc

    Life Inc: How Corporatism Conquered the World, and How We Can Take It Back

    by Douglas Rushkoff

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Neuromancer remains one of the most influential science-fiction books I’ve read. It’s the kind of book that influenced me even before I had read it by influencing books and TV shows and movies that I then read or watched. However, it’s not William Gibson’s imagination of cyberspace that sticks with me. Rather, it’s his vision of a future dominated by corporations, one where governments are atrophied entities and one’s life and prosperity are dependent upon…

  45. Book cover for The Last Lingua Franca

    The Last Lingua Franca: English Until the Return of Babel

    by Nicholas Ostler

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Well, don’t I feel all unoriginal. Here I was, prepared to critique this book’s extremely dry, technical style … only to read some of the other reviews on Goodreads and discover it is almost universally remarked upon. There goes that approach!

    To be fair, I was going to moderate my criticism by pointing out that if you are studying linguistics or have anything more than the passing interest in it that I do, then The

  46. Book cover for The Age of Wonder

    The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science

    by Richard Holmes

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    No matter how you slice it, the way we do science now is very different from the way we did science a few centuries ago, or even a single century ago. Or even a couple of decades ago. Just as the concept of science, itself a fairly recent term, has changed dramatically over the centuries, so too has the scientific method and the infrastructure through which we do science. Richard Holmes elects to analyze…

  47. Book cover for A Fair Country

    A Fair Country: Telling Truths About Canada

    by John Ralston Saul

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My exposure to politics as a child was, like so many things, gradual and haphazard. There were the overt attempts to indoctrinate me into democracy—vague spectres of mock elections in grade six dance in the deep recesses of memory. There more subtle episodes, such as the late-night satirical sketches of Royal Canadian Air Farce, where most of the humour would go over my head for years after I started watching. There were the disruptive…

  48. Book cover for Pythagoras' Trousers

    Pythagoras' Trousers: God, Physics and the Gender Wars

    by Margaret Wertheim

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I want to start this review by inviting you to read my review of A Short History of Nearly Everything, so you can understand my feelings about science going into this book.

    If that’s tl;dr, then allow me to reiterate the main thrust of the review: science is fucking awesome. Got it?

    Margaret Wertheim would agree with me, but in Pythagoras’ Trousers she explores how the general absence of women from mainstream scientific…

  49. Book cover for A Brief Guide to the Great Equations

    A Brief Guide to the Great Equations: The Hunt for Cosmic Beauty in Numbers

    by Robert P. Crease

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To paraphrase Mr T, I pity the fool who doesn’t see the beauty of mathematics inherent in the world around us. As a teacher, I feel rather complicit at times in robbing children of the joy of mathematics. The systemic, industrial tone of education does not often lend itself well to the investigation and discovery that should be the cornerstone of maths; I find this particularly true in the UK, where standardized tests and levels…