Books shelved under “Non-Fiction”

250 reviews found

  1. Book cover for IMPACT

    IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada

    by Warren Cariou

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I picked this up several years ago and am finally diving into it. It’s not what I expected—I was looking for something with essays, including personal essays, but this includes a lot more poems and other, shorter and more artistic pieces. IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada is an anthology that makes quite a statement. If it’s what you’re looking for, it’s going to satisfy. In my case, it wasn’t quite what I wanted, but don’t interpret…

  2. Book cover for King Leopold's Ghost

    King Leopold's Ghost

    by Adam Hochschild

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As someone who is interested in the history of colonialism, I was very intrigued when I learned of this book about the Belgian exploitation of Congo—or should I say, King Leopold's exploitation? For indeed, it’s one thing to read about British or French colonization elsewhere, or to hear the famous phrase “Scramble for Africa,” and another entirely to be reminded that the creation, colonization, and exploitation of Congo and the peoples therein was initially…

  3. Book cover for Can't Even

    Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation

    by Anne Helen Petersen

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last year, I read the BuzzFeed article that inspired this book, and Rebecca and I discussed this topic in an episode of our podcast. I didn’t learn that Anne Helen Petersen had turned her article into a book until just around the publication day. Fortunately, I was still able to receive a review copy through NetGalley! I was very excited to dig into this book. Although in some ways this book could never…

  4. Book cover for Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars

    Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars: Space, Exploration, and Life on Earth

    by Kate Greene

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Ever since I was a child, space has captivated my imagination. I love space. I love space science. I love science fiction. I have literally spent months of my life by this point, I would estimate, with the crews of the various starships Enterprise, Voyager, and the station Deep Space Nine. Yet never have I really had much desire to go to space. It seems like a cold, forbidding place, and the…

  5. Book cover for Finding Zero

    Finding Zero: A Mathematician's Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers

    by Amir D. Aczel

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The origins of our numbers, of our decimal place value system, of our numerals, is certainly an interesting topic! After all, we take for granted that we write numbers the way we do today—most of us learned Roman numerals as kids and quickly realize they are clunky and formidable as we try to write the year we were born (although anyone born after 2000 has a much easier time of it now!). But Amir Aczel…

  6. Book cover for Lost Feast

    Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food

    by Lenore Newman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The concept of culinary extinction came to my attention late last year, and it was one of those very intriguing, “Oh, yeah, I want to know more abou that” moments. I listened to Lenore Newman on an interview with Quirks & Quarks, and I also added Rob Dunn’s Never Out of Season to my to-read list at the same time (my library just happened to have this book and not Dunn’s, so I’m reading…

  7. Book cover for x + y

    x + y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender

    by Eugenia Cheng

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    At first I admit to some scepticism about the idea that we could use mathematics to rethink our conversations around gender. I was apprehensive because science, and even to some extent mathematics (or at least more applied subsets of its, like statistics) have been misused and abused in service of gender stereotype fallacies. Indeed, Eugenia Cheng points this out herself, and this, along with her careful and patient exposition of her topic, eventually won me…

  8. Book cover for Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty

    Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty: 1685-1715

    by Julian Whitehead

    Unrated

    Reviewed

    I can’t do it. Why do I have such bad luck with non-fiction British history on NetGalley? First The Tragic Daughters of Charles I and now Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty. Thanks to NetGalley and publisher Pen and Sword History for the eARC, but unfortunately, I did not finish this book.

    Here’s what I was anticipating based on the description of the book: I was hoping that Julian Whitehead would explain,…

  9. Book cover for How to Argue With a Racist

    How to Argue With a Racist: What Our Genes Do (and Don't) Say About Human Difference

    by Adam Rutherford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As a few other people on Goodreads have remarked, the subtitle of this book is more accurate than the title. How to Argue With a Racist: What Our Genes Do (and Don't) Say About Human Difference definitely discusses genetics as it relates to race. It is less useful if you’re looking for rhetorical tips on arguing with or debating racists or white supremacists. Adam Rutherford clearly and coherently lays out why such people are wrong…

  10. Book cover for Unacceptable

    Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal

    by Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To an outsider (Canadian) like me, the United States college admissions system is bizarre. First there’s the byzantine distinctions between community colleges, state schools, private colleges … as opposed to Canada, where university and college have distinct meanings. It’s not just the vise-grip of the standardized testing agencies on students’ futures … it’s the whole ranking system, the prestige, and the intense competition among post-secondary schools for money and athletes. As an educator, I look…

  11. Book cover for Sisters in Hate

    Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism

    by Seyward Darby

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My colleagues and friends keep coming to me for recommendations for anti-racist reading, and I, of course, want to keep educating myself. So I was chuffed when Little, Brown offered me a review copy of Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism. Now, I’m trying to mostly read anti-racism books written by people of colour—white people writing such books is fairly problematic, but Seyward Darby has seized on the…

  12. Book cover for Power Shift

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution

    by Sally Armstrong

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution exemplifies why the CBC Massey Lectures is such a compelling format. Sally Armstrong delivers, in 5 chapters of roughly equal length, a concise overview of the inequities faced by women around the world. She provides historical perspective, discusses the overt and covert biases present throughout our society, and includes examples of how we can change things for the better. She does her best to be inclusive and intersectional, not to…

  13. Book cover for The Sense of Style

    The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

    by Steven Pinker

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I thought I would balance out my recent mathematical non-fiction read with a non-fiction read about the English language. Not only did I have one gathering dust on my to-read shelf for years, but it’s one that is just as technical and interested in education as The Math(s) Fix was. So, of course, it took me longer to read too. Also, I was apprehensive regarding Steven Pinker (more on that at the end of the…

  14. Book cover for Into Thin Air

    Into Thin Air

    by Jon Krakauer

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My best friend Amanda recommended this to me a few years back, but if you don’t put a book in my hands when you recommend it, then good luck! Fortunately I was reminded of this book while looking for excerpts of travel writing to show to my Grade 11/12 English class last week. I was in the mood for some “adventure non-fiction” as one might call Into Thin Air. The library had an ebook…

  15. Book cover for The Math(s) Fix

    The Math(s) Fix: An Education Blueprint for the AI Age

    by Conrad Wolfram

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The Math(s) Fix wants you to believe that computers are coming for your math.

    Scary, isn’t it? You should find it scary. Computers are way better at calculating than we are, yet we insist that “real math” means learning how to do long division by hand!

    Wolfram Media kindly provided me an eARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for this review. I was definitely very interested in this.

    Some positionality, because even though…

  16. Book cover for Non-Binary Lives

    Non-Binary Lives: An Anthology of Intersecting Identities

    by Jos Twist

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You’d think the pandemic would mean I have more time to read rather than less, right? But for some reason my reading speed has decreased rather than increased. I’m making more of a comeback, but it still took me a long time to read and review Non-Binary Lives: An Anthology of Intersecting Identities. That shouldn’t reflect on the quality of this book. Similarly, I’m going to explain later that I’m kind of over these…

  17. Book cover for Love Lives Here

    Love Lives Here: A Story of Thriving in a Transgender Family

    by Amanda Jetté Knox

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    If I had read this book last year shortly after it came out, I would be writing this review from the position of a cisgender man and, like Amanda Jetté Knox, hopefully a trans ally trying to educate himself. Instead, I recently came out as transgender, not too long after having the epiphany that I am a trans woman (I’m still trying to work out the precise language I want to use to describe that…

  18. Book cover for Bossypants

    Bossypants

    by Tina Fey

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My boss, fittingly, gave me Bossypants! She gave it to me in June after I broke my elbow, and I promptly put it on my shelf and did not read it, like I do with most books. But now is the time! The time to read Tina Fey’s comedic memoir.

    Let’s start with the obvious: Fey is a comedy genius. That isn’t in question. She is funny. This book is funny. If you like…

  19. Book cover for To My Trans Sisters

    To My Trans Sisters

    by Charlie Craggs

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So I guess this is my coming out review? I actually have a blog post for that, but of course, some of my transition experiences thus far will be interspersed throughout this review.

    Hello, world. I’m Kara now. (That’s pronounced Car-uh.) I’m a trans woman. My pronouns are she/her.

    To My Trans Sisters seemed like a perfect book to read and then review on the day I came out online. It’s a collection…

  20. Book cover for Come As You Are

    Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life

    by Emily Nagoski

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life has been on my to-read list for a while (I blame Hannah Witton), but I finally bought it as a birthday present for a friend who shares my interest in these subjects. Emily Nagoski’s book is a comprehensive guide to how people with vulvas can become more comfortable and fulfilled in their sex lives. It’s a little bit science text, a…

  21. Book cover for Structures of Indifference

    Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City

    by Mary Jane Logan McCallum and Adele Perry

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Sometimes the perfect storm occurs. No one decision, no one action or inaction, leads to the outcome—it’s the combination that brings us to disaster. Sometimes, though, that perfect storm happens because of structural racism, as Mary Jane Logan McCallum and Adele Perry seek to demonstrate in Structures of Indifference: An Indigenous Life and Death in a Canadian City. This is the story of Brian Sinclair: his life, his death in a Winnipeg emergency room,…

  22. Book cover for For the Love of Men

    For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity

    by Liz Plank

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Huge note: Since writing this review, I’ve actually come out as transgender! So, uh, enjoy all the parts here where I laughably reaffirm my cis-ness! I will revise this review at some point. (Note to future Kara: actually do that.)

    I received this book as a gift from a friend who shares my interest in feminism. She found For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity somewhat revelatory. Like me, she…

  23. Book cover for White Fragility

    White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

    by Robin DiAngelo

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I am white. I am extremely white, because I grew up (and currently live) in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Despite this city being situated on the lands of Fort William First Nation, it remains incredibly white and segregated (see Seven Fallen Feathers for more info). That’s changing a little now, and we have more people of colour coming here as immigrants and refugees. But I grew up largely sheltered from socializing with children of immigrants or…

  24. Book cover for Flash Boys

    Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt

    by Michael Lewis

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As some of you may be aware, one of my many hats at my day job involves being a math teacher. I try to cover as much financial literacy as I can manage, regardless of the course I’m teaching, because this is a fundamentally important topic in our society. So I’m always looking to learn more about how finances actually work in our society. We hear a lot about the “stock market,” but what does…

  25. Book cover for High Heel

    High Heel

    by Summer Brennan

    3 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    I bought this as a birthday gift for someone I know who has quite the collection of shoes/heels, although it was on my to-read list before I considered it as a gift. High Heel is an unconventional treatise on this type of footwear. In short, easily-digestible chunks, Summer Brennan ponders the evolution of high heels in our history and culture. She wrestles with the conflicting attitudes towards high heels evinced by feminists, as well as…

  26. Book cover for Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers

    Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power

    by Sady Doyle

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Women are monsters, according to the patriarchy. That’s the thesis of Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power, Sady Doyle’s follow-up to her 2016 Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear... and Why. To elaborate a bit more, Doyle argues that the portrayal of women (and femininity) in our media and culture overlaps with our understanding of the monstrous, the Other, the unnatural or…

  27. Book cover for How to Hide an Empire

    How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States

    by Daniel Immerwahr

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I heard about this book on Twitter, I think, and read an excerpt (basically the introduction of the book) in The Guardian, and I was immediately sold. These days I read history books because I’ve discovered since leaving school that history is actually really, really difficult to learn. There’s just so much of it, and it’s just so subject to interpretation depending on the evidence available, the lens you use for that evidence, and…

  28. Book cover for Bad Blood

    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup

    by John Carreyrou

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’ve been watching a lot of Dragons’ Den lately. It’s good TV, and it’s easy to watch bits and pieces of an episode at a time while eating breakfast or taking a break from other tasks. As entertaining and soapy as the show can be, it’s also a disturbing reflection of how capitalism pervades our society. In an episode I recently watched, the Dragons went gaga over a chiropractor peddling a spray that purportedly improved…

  29. Book cover for Don't Read Poetry

    Don't Read Poetry: A Book About How to Read Poems

    by Stephanie Burt

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As previously discussed in my review of The Hatred of Poetry, I struggle with reading poetry. So I was tantalized by the title of this book. The previous book was a gift from a fellow teacher friend whose feelings about poetry are a bit less ambivalent than mine. When I learned about Don’t Read Poetry, I thought it would be a good reciprocal gift to her. Stephanie Burt’s thesis is basically that we…

  30. Book cover for Freedom Fallacy

    Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism

    by Miranda Kiraly

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t remember how Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism came on my radar. Someone somewhere must have mentioned it; it looks like I bought it from Book Depository four years ago. Anyway, I finally got around to reading it last summer. I was hoping to dig deeper into some of the essays, but honestly things like breaking my elbow took up most of my time, and now I just don’t have the inclination…

  31. Book cover for The Sleeping Giant Awakens

    The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation

    by David B. MacDonald

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I live in Thunder Bay, the place of the eponymous sleeping giant, Nanabozho, and a location steeped in anti-Indigenous racism and an ongoing legacy of colonial oppression. So, despite being a white settler and thus the privileged party here, I do have to deal with these issues—and like other settler Canadians, I’ve got a tremendous responsibility here. I picked up The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation because…

  32. Book cover for The Reality Bubble

    The Reality Bubble: Blind Spots, Hidden Truths, and the Dangerous Illusions That Shape Our World

    by Ziya Tong

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I love reading science fiction, and you might expect me to open this review with an encomium of how science fiction helps us imagine a way into a better future. But no. One of the reasons I love science fiction is for how it asks us to truly confront our assumptions about the way things are, and whether that’s inevitable.

    So many science fiction stories involving artificial intelligence place that intelligence into humanoid or human-like…

  33. Book cover for A Terrible Thing to Waste

    A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind

    by Harriet A. Washington

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The common reaction to people seeing what I was reading with A Terrible Thing to Waste was, “Environmental racism? What’s that?” So I explained it to them, fairly succinctly I think, because it really isn’t that difficult of a concept. Indeed, when I mentioned that, historically, decisions about where to dump waste and where to build factories and how to zone cities or rent houses have disproportionately affected marginalized and racialized people, most of those…

  34. Book cover for The Hormone Diaries

    The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods

    by Hannah Witton

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Just over two years ago I read and reviewed Hannah Witton’s first book, Doing It!: Let’s Talk About Sex. I loved seeing a YouTuber I respected and whose videos I so enjoyed meet with success in book form. With The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods, Witton does it again. Based this time on a long-running series on her channel chronicling her journey of self-exploration by discontinuing her birth control pill,

  35. Book cover for The Glass Universe

    The Glass Universe: How the Ladies of the Harvard Observatory Took the Measure of the Stars

    by Dava Sobel

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Dava Sobel does it again.

    I love learning about science, but you know what I might love even more? Learning how we know what we know about science. Take the stars, for example. How do we know what they're made of without ever visiting them? How can we possibly know how big, or massive, or far away, or hot they are? The fact we've managed to deduce such knowledge from the surface of this planet…

  36. Book cover for Dark Money

    Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right

    by Jane Mayer

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Money, as they say, talks. In Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right, Jane Mayer traces the network of political funding and lobbying spearheaded by the Koch brothers. Although they feature prominently in this book, this is not solely about them. Rather, it's about how a concerted effort in the past decades has influenced American politics. It's interesting because Mayer positions this story as a fundamental…

  37. Book cover for Not That Bad

    Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

    by Roxane Gay

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    With the news coming out of the United States about abortion bans and lawmakers who actually use phrases like “consensual rape,” this seemed like the right time to read Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture. Also, I was going on a library run and it was available. Roxane Gay collects 30 essays about rape or rape culture, some previously published and others newly written for this book. This is a serious book, sure,…

  38. Book cover for Palimpsest

    Palimpsest: A History of the Written Word

    by Matthew Battles

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh boy, I should have checked out the Goodreads rating and reviews before buying this one. But I couldn’t resist! It was on sale at Chapters, and a whole book that seems to be about the history of writing? Sure, I flipped through the first few pages and detected a slightly pretentious tone—but I just thought it meant the author was very passionate and serious about their topic! I was seduced, I say! Seduced!

    Palimpsest:

  39. Book cover for Wayfinding

    Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World

    by M.R. O'Connor

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This may not be the best book I read all year, but it is the best non-fiction book I’ve read so far in 2019, and any future non-fiction book this year is going to have to work hard to unseat this one. Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World snuck up on me. When I received my eARC from NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press, I was anticipating a mildly interesting book…

  40. Book cover for The Tragic Daughters of Charles I

    The Tragic Daughters of Charles I: Mary, Elizabeth & Henrietta Anne

    by Sarah-Beth Watkins

    Unrated

    Reviewed

    Reader, I finished the first chapter but could not go any further. The writing (or maybe copyediting) of this book is atrocious.

    I know that in this day and age commas are misunderstood beasts of punctuation. As someone very invested in eradicating comma splices from my students’ writing, I tend to lean on the side of using fewer commas when in doubt. Yet this book takes that position to the extreme. The result are torturous…

  41. Book cover for Blood, Sweat, and Pixels

    Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are Made

    by Jason Schreier

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I love behind-the-scenes looks at industries that we don’t often think about. Whether you’re buying a game in the store or downloading it from Steam, chances are you aren’t that knowledgeable about what the game development industry is actually like. Oh, you might have read some horror stories on Reddit, heard some of the gossip going back and forth on gaming blogs. Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are

  42. Book cover for Educated

    Educated

    by Tara Westover

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It’s hard to describe or summarize this book. Educated is a memoir about growing up in rural Idaho to very religious parents who do not trust public education or the medical establishment. Westover’s father believes that the end of days will be on them soon, and he takes prepping to an extreme. Consequently, most of the family never goes to high school. As Westover watches some of her siblings leave home, either to college or…

  43. Book cover for Hello World

    Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms

    by Hannah Fry

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Algorithms are increasingly an important part of our lives, yet even as more of us become aware of this, how much do we actually stop to consider what that means? How much do we stop to consider who is designing these algorithms and how they actually work? And why are we willing to give up so much control to them in the first place? Hello World is a short tour through the various ways in…

  44. Book cover for Darfur Diaries

    Darfur Diaries: Stories of Survival

    by Jen Marlowe

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Do you know what’s happening in Darfur right now? Because I definitely don’t—Darfur Diaries is about events from 2004, and in the 15 years that have elapsed, the situation has continued to change. So why read a book that is so out of date? Firstly, I bought this book somewhat less than recently—not in 2006, of course, but maybe 5 years ago. Secondly, the subject is still interesting and important enough to merit reading…

  45. Book cover for Sapiens

    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

    by Yuval Noah Harari

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’ve had Homo Deus, Yuval Noah Harari’s later book, sitting in a box waiting to be read for a couple of years now (because that’s how I roll). My bestie Amanda recently purchased Sapiens on the strength of several recommendations, with someone even suggesting she could use it as a university course textbook. However, she is neck-deep in writing a PhD thesis right now, so I’m subbing in! I do loves me some world…

  46. Book cover for For God, Country, and Coca-Cola

    For God, Country, and Coca-Cola: The Definitive History of the Great American Soft Drink and the Company That Makes It

    by Mark Pendergrast

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So one day I was looking for some advertisements I could use with my English classes to discuss graphic texts and advertising strategies. I stumbled across Vintage Ad Browser's repository of Coca-Cola advertisements, and I was just captivated. It had never occurred to me before that Coca-Cola provides a perfect opportunity to chart the evolution of advertising over the course of more than a century. I pulled many ads through the decades to use with…

  47. Book cover for Inferior

    Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—And the New Research That's Rewriting the Story

    by Angela Saini

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Sometimes it seems like smug people like to point smugly to science to justify their smug opinions about their superiority. Alas, many of these people turn out to be men declaiming the natural inferiority of women. As much as some men would like you to believe it, however, “science” doesn’t prove that women are naturally inferior to men. As Angela Saini explains in her book of the same name, “science” backs up what many of…

  48. Book cover for Delusions of Gender

    Delusions of Gender

    by Cordelia Fine

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, and that’s just the way it is, right? Girls like nurturing toys and boys like toys that involve motion or action, and don’t even bother trying to change those habits—they’re ingrained at birth, yeah? Doubtless you’ve heard these and other stereotypes and claims about the biological origins of sex differences. In some cases, such as the pink/blue divide, you might already be aware of the history…

  49. Book cover for No One at the Wheel

    No One at the Wheel: Driverless Cars and the Road of the Future

    by Samuel I. Schwartz

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Self-driving cars, or more broadly, autonomous vehicles (AVs) are really cool. I’m excited to see them become a reality. Nevertheless, there is a lot of hype around this topic. It seems like most of what I read about the subject comes from someone connected to the tech industry or the auto industry (or both), and that always makes me suspicious. No One at the Wheel: Driverless Cars and the Road of the Future is a…

  50. Book cover for The Quantum Labyrinth

    The Quantum Labyrinth: How Richard Feynman and John Wheeler Revolutionized Time and Reality

    by Paul Halpern

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The Quantum Labyrinth: How Richard Feynman and John Wheeler Revolutionized Time and Reality is a history book masquerading as a physics book, and I like that. I’m just as interested in the history of science as I am in science itself. As the title implies, Paul Halpern focuses on the lives of Feynman and Wheeler, protégés who individually and collectively had their fingers on the pulse of physics for much of the twentieth century. Halpern…