Books shelved under “Non-Fiction”

282 reviews found

  1. Book cover for The Transgender Issue

    The Transgender Issue: An Argument for Justice

    by Shon Faye

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is a book I have been waiting for. I don’t just mean in the sense that I pre-ordered it (though I did); I mean that I am very much interested in books about trans liberation as opposed to personal memoirs. I know Shon Faye’s The Transgender Issue is far from the first book on this subject. However, it is current and cogent. In her prologue, Faye makes the case clearly:

    The demand for true

  2. Book cover for Back to Earth

    Back to Earth: What Life in Space Taught Me About Our Home Planet—And Our Mission to Protect It

    by Nicole Stott

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Writing a memoir of any kind is hard. When you set yourself the challenge of using your experience as one of the few humans who have “slipped the surly bonds of Earth” to teach us about ecological awareness, the bar rises further. Back to Earth has a certain kind of charm to its optimistic idea that orbiting the planet helps you feel like we’re all in this together. Maybe I’m just getting pessimistic at the…

  3. Book cover for The Highly Sensitive Person

    The Highly Sensitive Person: How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You

    by Elaine N. Aron

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This was recommended to me by my bestie (and podcast cohost), Rebecca. She has a talent for pointing me in the direction of books that might feel like self-help to an extent but are actually interesting dives into specific topics in psychology. She most recently finally got me to read Quiet, by Susan Cain, a book that definitely has overlap with The Highly Sensitive Person. In particular, Cain actually mentions this term,…

  4. Book cover for Lone Survivors

    Lone Survivors: How We Came to Be the Only Humans on Earth

    by Stringer, Chris

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This book came on my radar after reading Fossil Men. Whereas that book is a deep dive into one spectacular fossil’s story and the stories of those involved in its finding and analysis, Lone Survivors is more of an overview of human evolution entire. Chris Stringer focuses in particular on the origins of modern humans, i.e., Homo sapiens and our relationship with our cousins the Neanderthals. In so doing, he furnishes us with vital…

  5. Book cover for Priceless

    Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures

    by Robert K. Wittman, John Shiffman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As many of you know, I am a sucker for heist and con artists stories. So I was drawn to Priceless because Robert K. Wittman offered a perspective I haven’t heard from—I’ve read a lot of stories from the points of view of the criminals, as well as from the marks. I was excited to hear from a retired law enforcement officer who specialized at going undercover. Wittman’s memoir is a treasure trove of insight…

  6. Book cover for The History of White People

    The History of White People

    by Nell Irvin Painter

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is a small thing, but I feel like it’s rare these days for a non-fiction book to lack a subtitle. The History of White People is minimalist in this sense: the title says it all. So too does the cover of my edition: pure white with a black circle in the centre containing the title and author in white block letters; nothing else on the front cover, blurbs pushed to the back and even…

  7. Book cover for How to Talk to a Science Denier

    How to Talk to a Science Denier: Conversations with Flat Earthers, Climate Deniers, and Others Who Defy Reason

    by Lee McIntyre

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As Lee McIntyre reflects in the book, this topic seems even more relevant now than it did prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. We have very effective vaccines that will help us mitigate the harms of COVID-19, yet a shocking proportion of people are hesitant to get vaccinated. A perhaps less-shocking proportion have decried public health measures, like mask mandates, designed to keep people safe. In How to Talk to a Science Denier, McIntyre tries…

  8. Book cover for Dear Leader

    Dear Leader: Poet, Spy, Escapee - A Look Inside North Korea

    by Jang Jin-sung and Shirley Lee

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Every so often there’s a topic that catches what I call my “background interest.” These are the topics that I enjoy reading about but don’t obsess over. North Korea is one such topic—I definitely want to keep reading and learning about the country, the regime, the people, but I’m pursuing it gradually. Five years ago I read In Order to Live, Yeonmi Park’s story of escaping North Korea. Dear Leader: Poet, Spy, Escapee –

  9. Book cover for Quiet

    Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    by Susan Cain

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Quiet was yet another one of those books lingering on my to-read list. I had watched Susan Cain’s TED talk at some point, and this book kept crossing my feeds, yet I never got around to it. I think, on some level, part of me was worried it would disappoint me. But when my bestie told me she had just read it, I knew the time had come. So, to the library I went!

    I…

  10. Book cover for Empire of Deception

    Empire of Deception: The Incredible Story of a Master Swindler Who Seduced a City and Captivated the Nation

    by Dean Jobb

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You know Kara likes stories of heists and swindles, con artists and the like, yes? Oh yes. For some reason this got lost when I moved and only resurfaced recently, so I’m finally getting to read Empire of Deception, all about Chicago swindler Leo Koretz. According to Dean Jobb, Koretz is impressive enough that we should be talking about Koretz schemes instead of Ponzi schemes, and after reading this book, it’s not difficult to…

  11. Book cover for White Tears/Brown Scars

    White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color

    by Ruby Hamad

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Although I would have picked this up on my own once I heard about it, I sought out and read White Tears/Brown Scars as a part of an antiracist book club that I joined for the month of June. Comprising mostly educators in Ontario, the book club’s organizer picked this book because our profession is predominantly white women, so white tears are a problem. As a white women, I’m a part of that problem,…

  12. Book cover for Unsavory Truth

    Unsavory Truth: How Food Companies Skew the Science of What We Eat

    by Marion Nestle

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’ve been intrigued by food science for a while. We have all at one point or another tried some kind of fad, whether it’s a specific diet or overloading on a superfood or something like that, I’m sure. Some of us fall harder than others. The more I tried to research and understand nutrition and food science for myself, the more I realized that a lot of food science is junk science. I wanted to…

  13. Book cover for Unstoppable

    Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World

    by Bill Nye

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It turns out I like Bill Nye’s writing a lot better when he is marshalling arguments in favour of science rather than sharing his life story. Although there is a lot of personal perspective in Unstoppable: Harnessing Science to Change the World, particularly towards the end, this book falls into the former category. Much like its companion Undeniable, this is a polemic. Whereas that book was about evolution, this book is about…

  14. Book cover for The Skin We’re In

    The Skin We’re In: A Year of Black Resistance and Power

    by Desmond Cole

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Somehow amidst all the well-deserved hype for The Skin We’re In, I missed hearing about its structure! This is Not Your Typical political memoir in that Desmond Cole has chosen a very deliberate structure: each chapter is a month in 2017 (with a coda for January 2018). He uses an event from each month of that year as a launching point for discussing issues of anti-Black racism and social justice in Canada. In this…

  15. Book cover for Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs

    Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe

    by Lisa Randall

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I very much enjoyed Lisa Randall’s Knocking on Heaven’s Door, which provided a layperson like me with a cogent explanation of the Standard Model that underpins modern particle physics. Randall is a physicist with a knack for explaining things both enthusiastically and clearly; she’s a good storyteller who doesn’t get too bogged down in trying to get all the details right for us. So I was intrigued enough to put Dark Matter and the

  16. Book cover for The Geek Feminist Revolution

    The Geek Feminist Revolution

    by Kameron Hurley

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Despite not enjoying The Mirror Empire to the point of not finishing it, I was still eager to read this collection of essays by Kameron Hurley. One of the reasons I was so disappointed about The Mirror Empire was that I really wanted to enjoy Hurley’s novels based on what I had seen from her on Twitter, her blog, etc. So I still wanted to try The Geek Feminist Revolution, and I’m glad that…

  17. Book cover for African Europeans

    African Europeans: An Untold History

    by Olivette Otélé

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As the description of this book suggests, many of us have an inaccurate understanding of the history of Black people’s presence in Europe. So I wanted to correct my understanding. It’s important for us to learn the history of the slave trade, of course. But if we reduce Black histories merely to slavery, we are engaging in yet another type of colonial violence. Olivette Otélé aims to highlight the presence of African Europeans throughout history.…

  18. Book cover for Fossil Men

    Fossil Men: The Quest for the Oldest Skeleton and the Origins of Humankind

    by Kermit Pattison

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is one of those books where I don’t remember how it came to be on my to-read list, but I’m glad it did. Fossil Men is a book about science and history—both subjects I adore in my non-fiction reading—in a somewhat niche subject of paleoanthropology. Indeed, I wouldn’t describe this as a “pop science” book, which is usually the type of scientific non-fiction I read. Kermit Pattison, while not himself a scientist, has spent…

  19. Book cover for The Secret Life of Groceries

    The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket

    by Benjamin Lorr

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As I have previously mentioned, I love reading books about the systems at work in our world that we barely ever think about. Grocery stores are one such system. The supply chain for things like grocery stores has been slightly more in the news lately, given disruptions caused by the pandemic (not to mention a ship blocking the Suez Canal for days). Yet the news can only ever give a cursory explanation of the…

  20. Book cover for Blackface

    Blackface

    by Ayanna Thompson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is an interesting idea for the Object Lessons series from Bloomsbury. Blackface seems like more of an idea or practice than an object, yet semantic quibbles aside, Ayanna Thompson presents a concise and compelling overview of the subject. Blackface discusses the history of the practice, and in particular, Thompson helps us understand how power imbalances between white and Black performers have contributed to the unequal dynamic in which white people often feel ok performing…

  21. Book cover for Why We Lost the Sex Wars

    Why We Lost the Sex Wars: Sexual Freedom in the #MeToo Era

    by Lorna N. Bracewell

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Sex good. Pornography bad. With such utterances we begin to draw the lines that marked the “sex wars” of the 1980s, in which feminism schismed over how to approach sexual expression and the pornography industry. For some feminists, porn amplified the potential for violence against women—porn was essentially as bad as rape. For other feminists, the fight against porn was a fight against freedom of sexual expression, freedom to openly and intensely celebrate women’s sexuality.…

  22. Book cover for The Future of You

    The Future of You: Can Your Identity Survive 21st-Century Technology?

    by Tracey Follows

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    If there’s anything I love, it’s discussing futurism and technology! This is the kind of book I could totally see myself learning about from CBC’s Spark (but in this case, I actually found it on NetGalley and received an e-ARC from Elliott & Thompson Limited in exchange for a review). The Future of You is an overview of various technologies that are complicating, problematizing, mutating, and perhaps rescuing our concept of identity as a legal…

  23. Book cover for Can You Hear Me Now?

    Can You Hear Me Now?: How I Found My Voice and Learned to Live with Passion and Purpose

    by Celina Caesar-Chavannes

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Like many Canadians, sometimes it feels like I know more about American politics than our own politics. American politics are louder, flashier, and take up more space in our news. So I’m trying my best to continue to monitor my country’s politics, particularly when it comes to issues of equity. That’s what drew me to Can You Hear Me Now?: I had heard of Celina Caesar-Chavannes and her rocky experience as a Black, female…

  24. Book cover for The Pornification of America

    The Pornification of America: How Raunch Culture Is Ruining Our Society

    by Bernadette C. Barton

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In my Grade 11 and 12 English class for adult learners, I always try to do at least a week on media literacy. We talk about bias and stereotypes, particularly as they relate to race, gender, and disability. One of my favourite activities regarding gender stereotypes involves examining ads and asking students to identify stereotypes present in those ads. It always provokes enlightening and interesting conversations from them. The hypersexualization of women as sex objects,…

  25. Book cover for Whipping Girl

    Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman On Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity

    by Julia Serano

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    One of my goals last year was, and for this year remains, to read more works by transgender authors, particularly about trans issues. I have been following Julia Serano on Twitter for a while now, so during my latest shopping expedition I decided to pick up Whipping Girl, which has also been on my radar for a while. Serano is not only a trans woman but also a molecular biologist, providing her with insights…

  26. Book cover for Einstein's Shadow

    Einstein's Shadow: A Black Hole, a Band of Astronomers, and the Quest to See the Unseeable

    by Seth Fletcher

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I became hooked on astronomy in a very big way. It’s just that idea that once you’ve passed the event horizon, then there is no escape from the black hole. So a book about taking a photograph of the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy using a radio telescope assembled out of telescopes from around the Earth? Yes, please. Einstein’s Shadow tries to tell the story of this project, the Event Horizon…

  27. Book cover for Reset

    Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society

    by Ronald J. Deibert

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Every year my dad buys me the CBC Massey Lectures book, and last year was no exception! Reading Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society after the events of January 6, in which white supremacist and fascist Americans, incited by their own president, stormed their own Capitol Building, was a trip. As Ronald J. Deibert unpacked the problematic aspects of our reliance upon social media, all I could think about was the role social media…

  28. Book cover for The Golden Ratio

    The Golden Ratio: The Story of Phi, the World's Most Astonishing Number

    by Mario Livio

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is one of the oldest (perhaps the oldest?) physical books I own and have yet to read. Goodreads suggests I’ve had it for nearly a decade. Oops. The truth is, I was never excited to read this. I love reading math books! But I am not particularly enamoured of books that explore one or two “special numbers,” and phi is perhaps my least favourite special number. The blurb from Dan Brown on the…

  29. Book cover for Friendshipping

    Friendshipping: The Art of Finding Friends, Being Friends, and Keeping Friends

    by Jenn Bane and Trin Garritano

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I have listened to Jenn and Trin’s Friendshipping podcast for a couple of years now. I adore it, mostly for their amusing and endearing banter, but also for their compassionate takes on listener questions about doing friendship—I enjoy their emphasis on this idea that friendship is a verb, because I agree. So when I heard they had turned their podcast into a self-help book, I pre-ordered the hell out of it—and I was also fortunate…

  30. Book cover for Mediocre

    Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America

    by Ijeoma Oluo

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    When I heard Ijeoma Oluo had written another book, there was no question in my mind that I would run, not walk, to NetGalley to request it. Publisher Seal Press made it happen! Medicore: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America is a formidable follow-up to So You Want to Talk About Race. In her first book, Oluo outlines all the ways that white people can move past ignorance and fragility to have…

  31. Book cover for Invisible Women

    Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

    by Caroline Criado Perez

    5 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Update May 17, 2021: So, today I learned Criado Perez is a TERF. Oops. I noticed, as remarked in the original review below, that the book doesn’t address issues of data collection for trans people. I didn’t realize at the time that Criado Perez’s omission was likely intentional. Sigh.

    So my quandary … I did think at the time I read this that Invisible Women was a very good book. It discusses very real…

  32. Book cover for A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

    A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

    by Alicia Elliott

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You ever read a book and have an epiphany, only for that epiphany to evaporate before you get around to writing it down or telling others? I think that happened here—I think one of Alicia Elliott’s essays in A Mind Spread Out on the Ground inspired an epiphany regarding my relationship with poetry … yet I have totally forgotten the thought now! I even paged through the book again to see if I could recover…

  33. Book cover for IMPACT

    IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada

    by Warren Cariou

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I picked this up several years ago and am finally diving into it. It’s not what I expected—I was looking for something with essays, including personal essays, but this includes a lot more poems and other, shorter and more artistic pieces. IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada is an anthology that makes quite a statement. If it’s what you’re looking for, it’s going to satisfy. In my case, it wasn’t quite what I wanted, but don’t interpret…

  34. Book cover for King Leopold's Ghost

    King Leopold's Ghost

    by Adam Hochschild

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As someone who is interested in the history of colonialism, I was very intrigued when I learned of this book about the Belgian exploitation of Congo—or should I say, King Leopold's exploitation? For indeed, it’s one thing to read about British or French colonization elsewhere, or to hear the famous phrase “Scramble for Africa,” and another entirely to be reminded that the creation, colonization, and exploitation of Congo and the peoples therein was initially…

  35. Book cover for Can't Even

    Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation

    by Anne Helen Petersen

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last year, I read the BuzzFeed article that inspired this book, and Rebecca and I discussed this topic in an episode of our podcast. I didn’t learn that Anne Helen Petersen had turned her article into a book until just around the publication day. Fortunately, I was still able to receive a review copy through NetGalley! I was very excited to dig into this book. Although in some ways this book could never…

  36. Book cover for Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars

    Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars: Space, Exploration, and Life on Earth

    by Kate Greene

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Ever since I was a child, space has captivated my imagination. I love space. I love space science. I love science fiction. I have literally spent months of my life by this point, I would estimate, with the crews of the various starships Enterprise, Voyager, and the station Deep Space Nine. Yet never have I really had much desire to go to space. It seems like a cold, forbidding place, and the…

  37. Book cover for Finding Zero

    Finding Zero: A Mathematician's Odyssey to Uncover the Origins of Numbers

    by Amir D. Aczel

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The origins of our numbers, of our decimal place value system, of our numerals, is certainly an interesting topic! After all, we take for granted that we write numbers the way we do today—most of us learned Roman numerals as kids and quickly realize they are clunky and formidable as we try to write the year we were born (although anyone born after 2000 has a much easier time of it now!). But Amir Aczel…

  38. Book cover for Lost Feast

    Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food

    by Lenore Newman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The concept of culinary extinction came to my attention late last year, and it was one of those very intriguing, “Oh, yeah, I want to know more abou that” moments. I listened to Lenore Newman on an interview with Quirks & Quarks, and I also added Rob Dunn’s Never Out of Season to my to-read list at the same time (my library just happened to have this book and not Dunn’s, so I’m reading…

  39. Book cover for x + y

    x + y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender

    by Eugenia Cheng

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    At first I admit to some scepticism about the idea that we could use mathematics to rethink our conversations around gender. I was apprehensive because science, and even to some extent mathematics (or at least more applied subsets of its, like statistics) have been misused and abused in service of gender stereotype fallacies. Indeed, Eugenia Cheng points this out herself, and this, along with her careful and patient exposition of her topic, eventually won me…

  40. Book cover for Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty

    Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty: 1685-1715

    by Julian Whitehead

    Unrated

    Reviewed

    I can’t do it. Why do I have such bad luck with non-fiction British history on NetGalley? First The Tragic Daughters of Charles I and now Espionage in the Divided Stuart Dynasty. Thanks to NetGalley and publisher Pen and Sword History for the eARC, but unfortunately, I did not finish this book.

    Here’s what I was anticipating based on the description of the book: I was hoping that Julian Whitehead would explain,…

  41. Book cover for How to Argue With a Racist

    How to Argue With a Racist: What Our Genes Do (and Don't) Say About Human Difference

    by Adam Rutherford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As a few other people on Goodreads have remarked, the subtitle of this book is more accurate than the title. How to Argue With a Racist: What Our Genes Do (and Don't) Say About Human Difference definitely discusses genetics as it relates to race. It is less useful if you’re looking for rhetorical tips on arguing with or debating racists or white supremacists. Adam Rutherford clearly and coherently lays out why such people are wrong…

  42. Book cover for Unacceptable

    Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal

    by Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To an outsider (Canadian) like me, the United States college admissions system is bizarre. First there’s the byzantine distinctions between community colleges, state schools, private colleges … as opposed to Canada, where university and college have distinct meanings. It’s not just the vise-grip of the standardized testing agencies on students’ futures … it’s the whole ranking system, the prestige, and the intense competition among post-secondary schools for money and athletes. As an educator, I look…

  43. Book cover for Sisters in Hate

    Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism

    by Seyward Darby

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My colleagues and friends keep coming to me for recommendations for anti-racist reading, and I, of course, want to keep educating myself. So I was chuffed when Little, Brown offered me a review copy of Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism. Now, I’m trying to mostly read anti-racism books written by people of colour—white people writing such books is fairly problematic, but Seyward Darby has seized on the…

  44. Book cover for Power Shift

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution

    by Sally Armstrong

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution exemplifies why the CBC Massey Lectures is such a compelling format. Sally Armstrong delivers, in 5 chapters of roughly equal length, a concise overview of the inequities faced by women around the world. She provides historical perspective, discusses the overt and covert biases present throughout our society, and includes examples of how we can change things for the better. She does her best to be inclusive and intersectional, not to…

  45. Book cover for The Sense of Style

    The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

    by Steven Pinker

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I thought I would balance out my recent mathematical non-fiction read with a non-fiction read about the English language. Not only did I have one gathering dust on my to-read shelf for years, but it’s one that is just as technical and interested in education as The Math(s) Fix was. So, of course, it took me longer to read too. Also, I was apprehensive regarding Steven Pinker (more on that at the end of the…

  46. Book cover for Into Thin Air

    Into Thin Air

    by Jon Krakauer

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My best friend Amanda recommended this to me a few years back, but if you don’t put a book in my hands when you recommend it, then good luck! Fortunately I was reminded of this book while looking for excerpts of travel writing to show to my Grade 11/12 English class last week. I was in the mood for some “adventure non-fiction” as one might call Into Thin Air. The library had an ebook…

  47. Book cover for The Math(s) Fix

    The Math(s) Fix: An Education Blueprint for the AI Age

    by Conrad Wolfram

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The Math(s) Fix wants you to believe that computers are coming for your math.

    Scary, isn’t it? You should find it scary. Computers are way better at calculating than we are, yet we insist that “real math” means learning how to do long division by hand!

    Wolfram Media kindly provided me an eARC of this book via NetGalley in exchange for this review. I was definitely very interested in this.

    Some positionality, because even though…

  48. Book cover for Non-Binary Lives

    Non-Binary Lives: An Anthology of Intersecting Identities

    by Jos Twist

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You’d think the pandemic would mean I have more time to read rather than less, right? But for some reason my reading speed has decreased rather than increased. I’m making more of a comeback, but it still took me a long time to read and review Non-Binary Lives: An Anthology of Intersecting Identities. That shouldn’t reflect on the quality of this book. Similarly, I’m going to explain later that I’m kind of over these…

  49. Book cover for Love Lives Here

    Love Lives Here: A Story of Thriving in a Transgender Family

    by Amanda Jetté Knox

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    If I had read this book last year shortly after it came out, I would be writing this review from the position of a cisgender man and, like Amanda Jetté Knox, hopefully a trans ally trying to educate himself. Instead, I recently came out as transgender, not too long after having the epiphany that I am a trans woman (I’m still trying to work out the precise language I want to use to describe that…

  50. Book cover for Bossypants

    Bossypants

    by Tina Fey

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My boss, fittingly, gave me Bossypants! She gave it to me in June after I broke my elbow, and I promptly put it on my shelf and did not read it, like I do with most books. But now is the time! The time to read Tina Fey’s comedic memoir.

    Let’s start with the obvious: Fey is a comedy genius. That isn’t in question. She is funny. This book is funny. If you like…