Books shelved under “Culture”

127 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Quiet

    Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

    by Susan Cain

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Quiet was yet another one of those books lingering on my to-read list. I had watched Susan Cain’s TED talk at some point, and this book kept crossing my feeds, yet I never got around to it. I think, on some level, part of me was worried it would disappoint me. But when my bestie told me she had just read it, I knew the time had come. So, to the library I went!

    I…

  2. Book cover for White Tears/Brown Scars

    White Tears/Brown Scars: How White Feminism Betrays Women of Color

    by Ruby Hamad

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Although I would have picked this up on my own once I heard about it, I sought out and read White Tears/Brown Scars as a part of an antiracist book club that I joined for the month of June. Comprising mostly educators in Ontario, the book club’s organizer picked this book because our profession is predominantly white women, so white tears are a problem. As a white women, I’m a part of that problem,…

  3. Book cover for The Skin We’re In

    The Skin We’re In: A Year of Black Resistance and Power

    by Desmond Cole

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Somehow amidst all the well-deserved hype for The Skin We’re In, I missed hearing about its structure! This is Not Your Typical political memoir in that Desmond Cole has chosen a very deliberate structure: each chapter is a month in 2017 (with a coda for January 2018). He uses an event from each month of that year as a launching point for discussing issues of anti-Black racism and social justice in Canada. In this…

  4. Book cover for The Geek Feminist Revolution

    The Geek Feminist Revolution

    by Kameron Hurley

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Despite not enjoying The Mirror Empire to the point of not finishing it, I was still eager to read this collection of essays by Kameron Hurley. One of the reasons I was so disappointed about The Mirror Empire was that I really wanted to enjoy Hurley’s novels based on what I had seen from her on Twitter, her blog, etc. So I still wanted to try The Geek Feminist Revolution, and I’m glad that…

  5. Book cover for The Secret Life of Groceries

    The Secret Life of Groceries: The Dark Miracle of the American Supermarket

    by Benjamin Lorr

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As I have previously mentioned, I love reading books about the systems at work in our world that we barely ever think about. Grocery stores are one such system. The supply chain for things like grocery stores has been slightly more in the news lately, given disruptions caused by the pandemic (not to mention a ship blocking the Suez Canal for days). Yet the news can only ever give a cursory explanation of the…

  6. Book cover for The Future of You

    The Future of You: Can Your Identity Survive 21st-Century Technology?

    by Tracey Follows

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    If there’s anything I love, it’s discussing futurism and technology! This is the kind of book I could totally see myself learning about from CBC’s Spark (but in this case, I actually found it on NetGalley and received an e-ARC from Elliott & Thompson Limited in exchange for a review). The Future of You is an overview of various technologies that are complicating, problematizing, mutating, and perhaps rescuing our concept of identity as a legal…

  7. Book cover for The Pornification of America

    The Pornification of America: How Raunch Culture Is Ruining Our Society

    by Bernadette C. Barton

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In my Grade 11 and 12 English class for adult learners, I always try to do at least a week on media literacy. We talk about bias and stereotypes, particularly as they relate to race, gender, and disability. One of my favourite activities regarding gender stereotypes involves examining ads and asking students to identify stereotypes present in those ads. It always provokes enlightening and interesting conversations from them. The hypersexualization of women as sex objects,…

  8. Book cover for Whipping Girl

    Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman On Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity

    by Julia Serano

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    One of my goals last year was, and for this year remains, to read more works by transgender authors, particularly about trans issues. I have been following Julia Serano on Twitter for a while now, so during my latest shopping expedition I decided to pick up Whipping Girl, which has also been on my radar for a while. Serano is not only a trans woman but also a molecular biologist, providing her with insights…

  9. Book cover for Reset

    Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society

    by Ronald J. Deibert

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Every year my dad buys me the CBC Massey Lectures book, and last year was no exception! Reading Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society after the events of January 6, in which white supremacist and fascist Americans, incited by their own president, stormed their own Capitol Building, was a trip. As Ronald J. Deibert unpacked the problematic aspects of our reliance upon social media, all I could think about was the role social media…

  10. Book cover for Mediocre

    Mediocre: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America

    by Ijeoma Oluo

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    When I heard Ijeoma Oluo had written another book, there was no question in my mind that I would run, not walk, to NetGalley to request it. Publisher Seal Press made it happen! Medicore: The Dangerous Legacy of White Male America is a formidable follow-up to So You Want to Talk About Race. In her first book, Oluo outlines all the ways that white people can move past ignorance and fragility to have…

  11. Book cover for Invisible Women

    Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

    by Caroline Criado Perez

    5 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Update May 17, 2021: So, today I learned Criado Perez is a TERF. Oops. I noticed, as remarked in the original review below, that the book doesn’t address issues of data collection for trans people. I didn’t realize at the time that Criado Perez’s omission was likely intentional. Sigh.

    So my quandary … I did think at the time I read this that Invisible Women was a very good book. It discusses very real…

  12. Book cover for A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

    A Mind Spread Out on the Ground

    by Alicia Elliott

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    You ever read a book and have an epiphany, only for that epiphany to evaporate before you get around to writing it down or telling others? I think that happened here—I think one of Alicia Elliott’s essays in A Mind Spread Out on the Ground inspired an epiphany regarding my relationship with poetry … yet I have totally forgotten the thought now! I even paged through the book again to see if I could recover…

  13. Book cover for IMPACT

    IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada

    by Warren Cariou

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I picked this up several years ago and am finally diving into it. It’s not what I expected—I was looking for something with essays, including personal essays, but this includes a lot more poems and other, shorter and more artistic pieces. IMPACT: Colonialism in Canada is an anthology that makes quite a statement. If it’s what you’re looking for, it’s going to satisfy. In my case, it wasn’t quite what I wanted, but don’t interpret…

  14. Book cover for Can't Even

    Can't Even: How Millennials Became the Burnout Generation

    by Anne Helen Petersen

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last year, I read the BuzzFeed article that inspired this book, and Rebecca and I discussed this topic in an episode of our podcast. I didn’t learn that Anne Helen Petersen had turned her article into a book until just around the publication day. Fortunately, I was still able to receive a review copy through NetGalley! I was very excited to dig into this book. Although in some ways this book could never…

  15. Book cover for Lost Feast

    Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food

    by Lenore Newman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The concept of culinary extinction came to my attention late last year, and it was one of those very intriguing, “Oh, yeah, I want to know more abou that” moments. I listened to Lenore Newman on an interview with Quirks & Quarks, and I also added Rob Dunn’s Never Out of Season to my to-read list at the same time (my library just happened to have this book and not Dunn’s, so I’m reading…

  16. Book cover for x + y

    x + y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender

    by Eugenia Cheng

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    At first I admit to some scepticism about the idea that we could use mathematics to rethink our conversations around gender. I was apprehensive because science, and even to some extent mathematics (or at least more applied subsets of its, like statistics) have been misused and abused in service of gender stereotype fallacies. Indeed, Eugenia Cheng points this out herself, and this, along with her careful and patient exposition of her topic, eventually won me…

  17. Book cover for Unacceptable

    Unacceptable: Privilege, Deceit & the Making of the College Admissions Scandal

    by Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    To an outsider (Canadian) like me, the United States college admissions system is bizarre. First there’s the byzantine distinctions between community colleges, state schools, private colleges … as opposed to Canada, where university and college have distinct meanings. It’s not just the vise-grip of the standardized testing agencies on students’ futures … it’s the whole ranking system, the prestige, and the intense competition among post-secondary schools for money and athletes. As an educator, I look…

  18. Book cover for Sisters in Hate

    Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism

    by Seyward Darby

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My colleagues and friends keep coming to me for recommendations for anti-racist reading, and I, of course, want to keep educating myself. So I was chuffed when Little, Brown offered me a review copy of Sisters in Hate: American Women on the Front Lines of White Nationalism. Now, I’m trying to mostly read anti-racism books written by people of colour—white people writing such books is fairly problematic, but Seyward Darby has seized on the…

  19. Book cover for Power Shift

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution

    by Sally Armstrong

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution exemplifies why the CBC Massey Lectures is such a compelling format. Sally Armstrong delivers, in 5 chapters of roughly equal length, a concise overview of the inequities faced by women around the world. She provides historical perspective, discusses the overt and covert biases present throughout our society, and includes examples of how we can change things for the better. She does her best to be inclusive and intersectional, not to…

  20. Book cover for The Sense of Style

    The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person's Guide to Writing in the 21st Century

    by Steven Pinker

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I thought I would balance out my recent mathematical non-fiction read with a non-fiction read about the English language. Not only did I have one gathering dust on my to-read shelf for years, but it’s one that is just as technical and interested in education as The Math(s) Fix was. So, of course, it took me longer to read too. Also, I was apprehensive regarding Steven Pinker (more on that at the end of the…

  21. Book cover for Bossypants

    Bossypants

    by Tina Fey

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My boss, fittingly, gave me Bossypants! She gave it to me in June after I broke my elbow, and I promptly put it on my shelf and did not read it, like I do with most books. But now is the time! The time to read Tina Fey’s comedic memoir.

    Let’s start with the obvious: Fey is a comedy genius. That isn’t in question. She is funny. This book is funny. If you like…

  22. Book cover for Come As You Are

    Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life

    by Emily Nagoski

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Come As You Are: The Surprising New Science that Will Transform Your Sex Life has been on my to-read list for a while (I blame Hannah Witton), but I finally bought it as a birthday present for a friend who shares my interest in these subjects. Emily Nagoski’s book is a comprehensive guide to how people with vulvas can become more comfortable and fulfilled in their sex lives. It’s a little bit science text, a…

  23. Book cover for For the Love of Men

    For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity

    by Liz Plank

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Huge note: Since writing this review, I’ve actually come out as transgender! So, uh, enjoy all the parts here where I laughably reaffirm my cis-ness! I will revise this review at some point. (Note to future Kara: actually do that.)

    I received this book as a gift from a friend who shares my interest in feminism. She found For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity somewhat revelatory. Like me, she…

  24. Book cover for White Fragility

    White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

    by Robin DiAngelo

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I am white. I am extremely white, because I grew up (and currently live) in Thunder Bay, Ontario. Despite this city being situated on the lands of Fort William First Nation, it remains incredibly white and segregated (see Seven Fallen Feathers for more info). That’s changing a little now, and we have more people of colour coming here as immigrants and refugees. But I grew up largely sheltered from socializing with children of immigrants or…

  25. Book cover for High Heel

    High Heel

    by Summer Brennan

    3 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    I bought this as a birthday gift for someone I know who has quite the collection of shoes/heels, although it was on my to-read list before I considered it as a gift. High Heel is an unconventional treatise on this type of footwear. In short, easily-digestible chunks, Summer Brennan ponders the evolution of high heels in our history and culture. She wrestles with the conflicting attitudes towards high heels evinced by feminists, as well as…

  26. Book cover for Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers

    Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power

    by Jude Ellison S. Doyle

    3 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Women are monsters, according to the patriarchy. That’s the thesis of Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power, Jude Ellison S. Doyle’s follow-up to their 2016 Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear... and Why. To elaborate a bit more, Doyle argues that the portrayal of women (and femininity) in our media and culture overlaps with our understanding of the monstrous, the Other, the…

  27. Book cover for Freedom Fallacy

    Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism

    by Miranda Kiraly

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t remember how Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism came on my radar. Someone somewhere must have mentioned it; it looks like I bought it from Book Depository four years ago. Anyway, I finally got around to reading it last summer. I was hoping to dig deeper into some of the essays, but honestly things like breaking my elbow took up most of my time, and now I just don’t have the inclination…

  28. Book cover for The Sleeping Giant Awakens

    The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation

    by David B. MacDonald

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I live in Thunder Bay, the place of the eponymous sleeping giant, Nanabozho, and a location steeped in anti-Indigenous racism and an ongoing legacy of colonial oppression. So, despite being a white settler and thus the privileged party here, I do have to deal with these issues—and like other settler Canadians, I’ve got a tremendous responsibility here. I picked up The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools, and the Challenge of Conciliation because…

  29. Book cover for A Terrible Thing to Waste

    A Terrible Thing to Waste: Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind

    by Harriet A. Washington

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The common reaction to people seeing what I was reading with A Terrible Thing to Waste was, “Environmental racism? What’s that?” So I explained it to them, fairly succinctly I think, because it really isn’t that difficult of a concept. Indeed, when I mentioned that, historically, decisions about where to dump waste and where to build factories and how to zone cities or rent houses have disproportionately affected marginalized and racialized people, most of those…

  30. Book cover for The Hormone Diaries

    The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods

    by Hannah Witton

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Just over two years ago I read and reviewed Hannah Witton’s first book, Doing It!: Let’s Talk About Sex. I loved seeing a YouTuber I respected and whose videos I so enjoyed meet with success in book form. With The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods, Witton does it again. Based this time on a long-running series on her channel chronicling her journey of self-exploration by discontinuing her birth control pill,

  31. Book cover for Not That Bad

    Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

    by Roxane Gay

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    With the news coming out of the United States about abortion bans and lawmakers who actually use phrases like “consensual rape,” this seemed like the right time to read Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture. Also, I was going on a library run and it was available. Roxane Gay collects 30 essays about rape or rape culture, some previously published and others newly written for this book. This is a serious book, sure,…

  32. Book cover for Palimpsest

    Palimpsest: A History of the Written Word

    by Matthew Battles

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh boy, I should have checked out the Goodreads rating and reviews before buying this one. But I couldn’t resist! It was on sale at Chapters, and a whole book that seems to be about the history of writing? Sure, I flipped through the first few pages and detected a slightly pretentious tone—but I just thought it meant the author was very passionate and serious about their topic! I was seduced, I say! Seduced!

    Palimpsest:

  33. Book cover for Blood, Sweat, and Pixels

    Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are Made

    by Jason Schreier

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I love behind-the-scenes looks at industries that we don’t often think about. Whether you’re buying a game in the store or downloading it from Steam, chances are you aren’t that knowledgeable about what the game development industry is actually like. Oh, you might have read some horror stories on Reddit, heard some of the gossip going back and forth on gaming blogs. Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are

  34. Book cover for Hello World

    Hello World: Being Human in the Age of Algorithms

    by Hannah Fry

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Algorithms are increasingly an important part of our lives, yet even as more of us become aware of this, how much do we actually stop to consider what that means? How much do we stop to consider who is designing these algorithms and how they actually work? And why are we willing to give up so much control to them in the first place? Hello World is a short tour through the various ways in…

  35. Book cover for Bad Feminist

    Bad Feminist: Essays

    by Roxane Gay

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Bad Feminist has been on my radar for years, but as with many such books, it took someone physically putting it in my hands for me to get around to it. In this case, my best friend Rebecca (with whom I have started a podcast!) gave this to me as a going-away present when she moved to Montreal (I’m not sure she understands how going-away presents work?). She inscribed it, “To our first book,…

  36. Book cover for Delusions of Gender

    Delusions of Gender

    by Cordelia Fine

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Pink is for girls and blue is for boys, and that’s just the way it is, right? Girls like nurturing toys and boys like toys that involve motion or action, and don’t even bother trying to change those habits—they’re ingrained at birth, yeah? Doubtless you’ve heard these and other stereotypes and claims about the biological origins of sex differences. In some cases, such as the pink/blue divide, you might already be aware of the history…

  37. Book cover for All Our Relations

    All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward

    by Tanya Talaga

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    One year ago I read Tanya Talaga’s Seven Fallen Feathers, in which she remembers the seven Indigenous youths who died far from home while attending Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School here in Thunder Bay. In that heartbreaking and essential work, she links these deaths to a structure of colonialism and white supremacy and an ongoing form of cultural genocide in which the government and the rest of us remain complicit. Now Talaga is back…

  38. Book cover for Broad Band

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet

    by Claire L. Evans

    5 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Every so often, you read a non-fiction book that just speaks to you, that sticks with you because it’s not just informative but because it fits your level of background knowledge and expands your understanding of a topic perfectly. Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet is such a book for me. Claire L. Evans traces the development of the modern Internet from its precursors, the earliest mechanical and electronic…

  39. Book cover for How Music Got Free

    How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, the Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Piracy

    by Stephen Richard Witt

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    How Music Got Free: The End of an Industry, the Turn of the Century, and the Patient Zero of Piracy was published in 2015, and I was a little worried that being three years old would already render it obsolete. Fortunately, I was wrong. Stephen Witt’s explanation of the rise of mp3 and the transition from CDs to digital stores to streaming, along with the corresponding piracy, is clear and detailed and incredibly fascinating. This…

  40. Book cover for In Search of A Better World

    In Search of A Better World: A Human Rights Odyssey

    by Payam Akhavan

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    While I was not a fan of the last collection of Massey Lectures that I read, the brilliant thing about this series is that every year is very different. Each year brings a new speaker, a new topic, and an entirely new way of approaching the topic and the format. (I am very excited for this year’s lectures delivered by Tanya Talaga, author of Seven Fallen Feathers). Last year’s lectures by Payam Akhavan work…

  41. Book cover for Command and Control

    Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

    by Eric Schlosser

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This was a birthday gift, along with A Criminal Magic, from my friend Amanda, and I’m just now getting to it—which, especially when it comes to my non-fiction backlog, isn’t actually that bad of a delay! Amanda was just getting to know me at the time, so she picked two books off my to-read list. I’m not sure why I had Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety

  42. Book cover for Girl Up

    Girl Up

    by Laura Bates

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It took me a while, but I figured out why it took me so long to read this book: the typeface.

    That might seem picky, or petty, but it's true. This small, heavyweight, sans serif typeface just did not appeal to me. I trucked on—because this book is definitely reading—but I did not, alas, enjoy the actual experience of reading it. Your mileage will probably vary, but typography is something I’m sensitive to.

    Anyway,…

  43. Book cover for Weapons of Math Destruction

    Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy

    by Cathy O'Neil

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The profile of the term “Big Data” has risen recently. Yet, like so many buzzwords, people often don’t fully grasp the significance of the term. “Big Data” is more than the nebulous connotation of corporations collecting our information, and perhaps packaging and selling it—although it is that. It is, in fact, about how corporations quantify everything we do, even the information we don’t realize we’re leaking out into the world, and then use that data…

  44. Book cover for Policing Black Lives

    Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present

    by Robyn Maynard

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Policing Black Lives took me almost an entire month to read, which is virtually unheard of, and it’s not a very long book. It is, however, very dense, academic, and not at all happy reading. Nevertheless, it is an important book. I first heard about it, and from Robyn Maynard, on an episode of the Canadaland Commons podcast devoted to the gaps in Canada’s curriculum on the history of slavery and anti-Blackness. Since I grew…

  45. Book cover for Belonging

    Belonging: The Paradox of Citizenship

    by Adrienne Clarkson

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Occasionally copies of the Massey Lectures show up in my hands (I think it’s usually my dad’s fault). Belonging: The Paradox of Citizenship is the collection of Adrienne Clarkson’s 2014 lectures. As the title implies, she examines what it means to “belong” to a nation, with specific reference to her experience as an immigrant Canadian. Clarkson is definitely a fascinating author for this topic. Given her background, her career as a journalist, and then her…

  46. Book cover for The Feminist Porn Book

    The Feminist Porn Book: The Politics of Producing Pleasure

    by Tristan Taormino

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    “My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit.”

    This powerful statement, first deployed and used in this essay by Flavia Dzodan, is often on my mind. And I choose to open my review of The Feminist Porn Book with it, because that is how I want to position myself. As a white man who tries his best to be feminist, I recognize I have a hell of a lot of privilege in…

  47. Book cover for The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

    by Rebecca Skloot

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Our science teachers do a remarkable job with what limited resources, time, and support they have in school today. However, one of the many areas in which public science education could be improved is the way in which we examine the hidden systems that power science itself, and the way these systems intersect with our society. Cell lines are a great example of this. We learn about biomedical research in school, about cells, about vaccines—but…

  48. Book cover for Female Chauvinist Pigs

    Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

    by Ariel Levy

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Although I’ve been familiar with the concept for a while, I think I first came across the term Female Chauvinist Pig in Holly Bourne’s excellent How Hard Can Love Be?. In her novel, Bourne presents us with Melody, a stereotypical busty blonde who struts her stuff and embraces her sexuality and “hotness” because she believes that this is what makes her empowered in today’s society. It’s such an intriguing concept, something that interests me…

  49. Book cover for Algorithms of Oppression

    Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism

    by Safiya Umoja Noble

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So you read So You Want to Talk About Race and now you have more questions. Specifically, you’re wondering how privilege affects your life online. Surely the Internet is the libertarian cyber-utopia we were all promised, right? It’s totally free of bias and discrimina—sorry, I can’t even write that with a straight face.

    Of course the Internet is a flaming cesspool of racism and misogyny. We can’t have good things.

    What Safiya Umoja Noble sets…

  50. Book cover for White Privilege

    White Privilege: The Myth of a Post-Racial Society

    by Kalwant Bhopal

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So let’s say you acknowledge white privilege exists. (If you don’t, you should back up and maybe read something like So You Want to Talk about Race.) But maybe now you’re wondering how much white privilege actually affects people, particularly when it comes to issues of education and the workplace. That’s what White Privilege: The Myth of a Post-Racial Society tackles. Kalwant Bhopal carefully and in great detail pieces together a picture of how…