Books shelved under “Comics”

13 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism

    Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism: Comics on Relationships, Life and Food

    by Prudence Geerts

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’d like to crack a joke like, “I love this title because it’s basically my life” except that would be a lie, because I’m actually killing it at adulting this year … not that I want to be. Sometimes just have to. Still, Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism really does have an excellent title. Prudence Geerts has produced a cornucopia of tiny comics that illustrate, reflect upon, and poke fun at her own experiences,…

  2. Book cover for Saga, Vol. 7

    Saga, Vol. 7

    by Brian K. Vaughan

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Oh. Em. Gee. Saga, Volume 7 might just be the saddest, most heart-wrenching thing I’ve read this year. It’s not quite at the nadir of A Fine Balance, but it comes close. I am struggling to recall a single positive and redeeming moment in this book. There’s … there’s a lot of bleakness and heartbreak here.

    As with many a long-running series, I’m starting to run out of new and creative commentary. Brian K.…

  3. Book cover for Supernormal Step, Vol. 3

    Supernormal Step, Vol. 3: Power Struggle

    by M. Lee Lunsford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It has been over a year since I last reviewed a volume of Supernormal Step, the fantastic webcomic by Michael Lee Lunsford about Fiona, a girl with blue hair who has been sucked into a strange, parallel universe where magic is real and that’s really freaky. Fiona has long been on a search for a way home, and while she doesn’t get much closer in this one, she does learn more about the mysterious…

  4. Book cover for Drawing the Line

    Drawing the Line: Indian Women Fight Back!

    by Priya Kuriyan

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    She doesn’t want to get married.

    She wants her darker skin to be celebrated, not medicated.

    She wants to escape the memories of abuse at the hands of her uncle and break the cycle for her own daughter.

    She wants a job and doesn’t understand why it’s so hard for the men who might hire her to look her in the eye instead of her breasts.

    None of these stories are my stories. My story…

  5. Book cover for Supernormal Step, Vol. 2

    Supernormal Step, Vol. 2: A Fine Ado

    by M. Lee Lunsford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In my previous review I talked in broad terms about why I enjoy Supernormal Step, because I just wanted to outline why it’s worth spending your precious time on a new webcomic/graphic novel.

    In Volume 2 (Chapters 4–6 of the webcomic), M Lee Lunsford broadens our understanding of Fiona and the main cast, but not before Fiona temporarily leaves them behind in search of solitude. (Hint: That does not work out well for her.)

  6. Book cover for Supernormal Step, Vol. 1

    Supernormal Step, Vol. 1: Runaway

    by M. Lee Lunsford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Serial webcomics are hard. Pacing and scheduling are a must, and even we readers can have trouble keeping plotlines straight. I completely understand why some people don't follow a comic regularly but instead binge every few weeks after a chapter has finished.

    Supernormal Step is one of my favourite webcomics and one of the few serial webcomics I read regularly. It's about Fiona Dae, a woman pulled into a strange parallel universe where magic exists…

  7. Book cover for Saga, Vol. 3

    Saga, Vol. 3

    by Brian K. Vaughan

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Yes, it’s another review of Saga, this time of Volume Three, the last of three volumes I bought for a friend. It’s hard to think of original things to say, having read and reviewed the first two in quick succession. So let’s look at the journey Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples are taking us on after nearly twenty issues of this incredibly story.

    I’m impressed at the complexity of the supporting cast. Kiara,…

  8. Book cover for Saga, Vol. 2

    Saga, Vol. 2

    by Brian K. Vaughan

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Now, I am a lucky and spoiled person who is reading Saga collected in volumes, rather than reading each issue as it is released like a chump—er, I mean, true fan. I guess it’s comparable to binge-watching a show after the entire season has been released rather than watching it week-by-week. In the end, you get to the same place. But the experience is totally different.

    Saga, Volume Two raises the stakes after Volume One…

  9. Book cover for Saga, Vol. 1

    Saga, Vol. 1

    by Brian K. Vaughan

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Saga first came onto my radar last year when it was nominated for a Hugo Award. (Volume Two was nominated this year!) In fact, I’m pretty sure that it was included in the Voters Packet.

    I didn’t read it.

    I don’t read many graphic novels. I understand why people like them, and part of me wishes I read more—but obviously that’s not a big enough part, or else I actually would. Simply put, I am…

  10. Book cover for Chicks Dig Comics

    Chicks Dig Comics: A Celebration of Comic Books by the Women Who Love Them

    by Lynne M. Thomas

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t read comic books that much.

    Given my reading habits, and how quickly I read, I find it difficult to go out and get every issue of a serial. I’ve read some collected works, like Sandman, and enjoyed them—storytelling is storytelling, whether it’s in words or art on a page. Digital editions might help, once we finally give up on that DRM nonsense. However, even with that hurdle cleared, I’ll admit I’m not…

  11. Book cover for Kill Shakespeare, Vol. 1

    Kill Shakespeare, Vol. 1: A Sea of Troubles

    by Conor McCreery

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is such an amazing concept, and when I first heard about it, I was taken aback by how unbelievably awesome it might be. Some of Shakespeare’s most memorable characters face off against each other in a desperate race to find a wizard named William Shakespeare. Othello, Juliet, Falstaff, and others believe that “Will” will deliver them from the tyranny of King Richard III. Richard, along with the Macbeths and Iago, plot to kill Shakespeare…

  12. Book cover for The Essential Calvin and Hobbes

    The Essential Calvin and Hobbes: A Calvin and Hobbes Treasury

    by Bill Watterson

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    My dad gave me this book Christmas 2009, and I prior to reading it last week, I had not experienced Calvin and Hobbes. Well, that isn't completely true. I had read one or two strips, I suppose. Seen other people reading it. But I hadn't experienced it. I had not sat down with a thick, luscious book full of Calvin and Hobbes strips, full of wonderful, pinpoint and intelligent humour.

    When I did finally…

  13. Book cover for The Physics of Superheroes

    The Physics of Superheroes: Spectacular Second Edition

    by James Kakalios

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I must confess that, as a kid and an adolescent, I never shared the ardour for comic books many of my peers did. I collected Archie comics and read the odd Superman comic, but that was about it. So unlike most, who come for the superheroes, I came to The Physics of Superheroes for the physics.

    As an aspiring teacher, I love to hear about new ways of teaching difficult or boring topics to students.…