Books shelved under “Feminism”

78 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Red Letter Days

    Red Letter Days

    by Sarah-Jane Stratford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Two years ago I picked up, on a whim, Sarah-Jane Stratford’s Radio Girls, and I fell in love. The book was the perfect blend of history, politics, and feminism. I’m pleased to say that with Red Letter Days, Stratford has done it again. While the protagonists share some superficial qualities—both move from North America to Britain, both work in communications industries in some capacity, both become somewhat embroiled in espionage and skullduggery—Stratford has…

  2. Book cover for x + y

    x + y: A Mathematician's Manifesto for Rethinking Gender

    by Eugenia Cheng

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    At first I admit to some scepticism about the idea that we could use mathematics to rethink our conversations around gender. I was apprehensive because science, and even to some extent mathematics (or at least more applied subsets of its, like statistics) have been misused and abused in service of gender stereotype fallacies. Indeed, Eugenia Cheng points this out herself, and this, along with her careful and patient exposition of her topic, eventually won me…

  3. Book cover for Power Shift

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution

    by Sally Armstrong

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Power Shift: The Longest Revolution exemplifies why the CBC Massey Lectures is such a compelling format. Sally Armstrong delivers, in 5 chapters of roughly equal length, a concise overview of the inequities faced by women around the world. She provides historical perspective, discusses the overt and covert biases present throughout our society, and includes examples of how we can change things for the better. She does her best to be inclusive and intersectional, not to…

  4. Book cover for Pretending

    Pretending

    by Holly Bourne

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So! Many! Thoughts! About this one. I was so excited for Pretending, Holly Bourne’s second adult novel, after really loving How Do You Like Me Now?. My initial reaction to this novel was bemusement … I didn’t identify with April as much as I did with Tori, and for a moment I worried that would make me like this novel less. Indeed, if you pressed me, I would happily confess that How Do

  5. Book cover for To My Trans Sisters

    To My Trans Sisters

    by Charlie Craggs

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    So I guess this is my coming out review? I actually have a blog post for that, but of course, some of my transition experiences thus far will be interspersed throughout this review.

    Hello, world. I’m Kara now. (That’s pronounced Car-uh.) I’m a trans woman. My pronouns are she/her.

    To My Trans Sisters seemed like a perfect book to read and then review on the day I came out online. It’s a collection…

  6. Book cover for For the Love of Men

    For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity

    by Liz Plank

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Huge note: Since writing this review, I’ve actually come out as transgender! So, uh, enjoy all the parts here where I laughably reaffirm my cis-ness! I will revise this review at some point. (Note to future Kara: actually do that.)

    I received this book as a gift from a friend who shares my interest in feminism. She found For the Love of Men: A New Vision for Mindful Masculinity somewhat revelatory. Like me, she…

  7. Book cover for High Heel

    High Heel

    by Summer Brennan

    3 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    I bought this as a birthday gift for someone I know who has quite the collection of shoes/heels, although it was on my to-read list before I considered it as a gift. High Heel is an unconventional treatise on this type of footwear. In short, easily-digestible chunks, Summer Brennan ponders the evolution of high heels in our history and culture. She wrestles with the conflicting attitudes towards high heels evinced by feminists, as well as…

  8. Book cover for Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers

    Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power

    by Sady Doyle

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Women are monsters, according to the patriarchy. That’s the thesis of Dead Blondes and Bad Mothers: Monstrosity, Patriarchy, and the Fear of Female Power, Sady Doyle’s follow-up to her 2016 Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear... and Why. To elaborate a bit more, Doyle argues that the portrayal of women (and femininity) in our media and culture overlaps with our understanding of the monstrous, the Other, the unnatural or…

  9. Book cover for The Places I've Cried in Public

    The Places I've Cried in Public

    by Holly Bourne

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Every time I start another Holly Bourne book, I’m scared. I think, “Is this the time? Is this the book where Bourne lets me down, and I have to be disappointed??” And the answer is always no, as it is with The Places I’ve Cried in Public. I read this mostly in private, but otherwise there would have been some public tears, let me tell you.

    Trigger warnings in this book for discussion and…

  10. Book cover for Freedom Fallacy

    Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism

    by Miranda Kiraly

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I don’t remember how Freedom Fallacy: The Limits of Liberal Feminism came on my radar. Someone somewhere must have mentioned it; it looks like I bought it from Book Depository four years ago. Anyway, I finally got around to reading it last summer. I was hoping to dig deeper into some of the essays, but honestly things like breaking my elbow took up most of my time, and now I just don’t have the inclination…

  11. Book cover for The Women's War

    The Women's War

    by Jenna Glass

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I grabbed this book off my library’s new books shelf, and I’m glad I did. I’m happy to live in an era where we can have a blurb on the cover of a book that says, “#MeToo and #Resistance through the lens of epic fantasy.” Count me in! The Women’s War posits a world where men control the direction of women’s lives and a woman’s worth is largely determined by the children she has or…

  12. Book cover for Speak

    Speak

    by Laurie Halse Anderson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Reading this book was a surreal experience in a few ways. I read a lot of contemporary YA, so I’m used to feeling a lot older than the characters. Speak was originally published in 1999, when I was ten years old. So I was younger than Melinda when this book first came out, and the high school setting actually predates my own high school experience. Yet I’m older than her now, when I read it.…

  13. Book cover for The Hormone Diaries

    The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods

    by Hannah Witton

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Just over two years ago I read and reviewed Hannah Witton’s first book, Doing It!: Let’s Talk About Sex. I loved seeing a YouTuber I respected and whose videos I so enjoyed meet with success in book form. With The Hormone Diaries: The Bloody Truth About Our Periods, Witton does it again. Based this time on a long-running series on her channel chronicling her journey of self-exploration by discontinuing her birth control pill,

  14. Book cover for Not That Bad

    Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture

    by Roxane Gay

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    With the news coming out of the United States about abortion bans and lawmakers who actually use phrases like “consensual rape,” this seemed like the right time to read Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture. Also, I was going on a library run and it was available. Roxane Gay collects 30 essays about rape or rape culture, some previously published and others newly written for this book. This is a serious book, sure,…

  15. Book cover for Bad Feminist

    Bad Feminist: Essays

    by Roxane Gay

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Bad Feminist has been on my radar for years, but as with many such books, it took someone physically putting it in my hands for me to get around to it. In this case, my best friend Rebecca (with whom I have started a podcast!) gave this to me as a going-away present when she moved to Montreal (I’m not sure she understands how going-away presents work?). She inscribed it, “To our first book,…

  16. Book cover for Inferior

    Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong—And the New Research That's Rewriting the Story

    by Angela Saini

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Sometimes it seems like smug people like to point smugly to science to justify their smug opinions about their superiority. Alas, many of these people turn out to be men declaiming the natural inferiority of women. As much as some men would like you to believe it, however, “science” doesn’t prove that women are naturally inferior to men. As Angela Saini explains in her book of the same name, “science” backs up what many of…

  17. Book cover for Broad Band

    Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet

    by Claire L. Evans

    5 out of 5 stars

    Updated | Reviewed

    Every so often, you read a non-fiction book that just speaks to you, that sticks with you because it’s not just informative but because it fits your level of background knowledge and expands your understanding of a topic perfectly. Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet is such a book for me. Claire L. Evans traces the development of the modern Internet from its precursors, the earliest mechanical and electronic…

  18. Book cover for Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism

    Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism: Comics on Relationships, Life and Food

    by Prudence Geerts

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I’d like to crack a joke like, “I love this title because it’s basically my life” except that would be a lie, because I’m actually killing it at adulting this year … not that I want to be. Sometimes just have to. Still, Bad at Adulting, Good at Feminism really does have an excellent title. Prudence Geerts has produced a cornucopia of tiny comics that illustrate, reflect upon, and poke fun at her own experiences,…

  19. Book cover for Radio Girls

    Radio Girls

    by Sarah-Jane Stratford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    What do you do when your friend Amanda gives you a $10 gift card for Chapters as part of a “pick me up” gift while she’s away?

    You unwittingly go to Chapters the same week they have select books on 3 for $10 and you are WINNING AT LIFE, my friends. Radio Girls is the first of the three books I bought (with my iRewards discount, even after tax, the total came to just under…

  20. Book cover for How To Be Famous

    How To Be Famous

    by Caitlin Moran

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is not a drill.

    I repeat: NOT A DRILL.

    Yes, Caitlin Moran has written a sequel to the sublime How to Build a Girl. I never expected this, never asked for this … and I definitely don’t deserve it, but young women do. This sequel is arguably better, brighter, more brilliant than the first book. I devoured it in a day, and I already want to go back and re-read it, underline it,…

  21. Book cover for How Do You Like Me Now?

    How Do You Like Me Now?

    by Holly Bourne

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This first paragraph is just me screaming really loudly and enthusiastically because yessssss another Holly Bourne novel and this one is for adults!! I am an unapologetic fan of everything Bourne writes. Her young adult Spinster Club trilogy is incredible. Now she has a book out about adulting and relationships, and it is just as brilliant.

    How Do You Like Me Now? is the story of Tori Bailey, who wrote a bestselling memoir of her…

  22. Book cover for Girl Up

    Girl Up

    by Laura Bates

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It took me a while, but I figured out why it took me so long to read this book: the typeface.

    That might seem picky, or petty, but it's true. This small, heavyweight, sans serif typeface just did not appeal to me. I trucked on—because this book is definitely reading—but I did not, alas, enjoy the actual experience of reading it. Your mileage will probably vary, but typography is something I’m sensitive to.

    Anyway,…

  23. Book cover for What's a Girl Gotta Do?

    What's a Girl Gotta Do?

    by Holly Bourne

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Some books are meant to be sipped and savoured over the course of many days. You have to engage with them gradually, wade into them and wait for their temperature to feel comfortable against your mind. Other books demand to be devoured in a single sitting. I’ve determined that, for me, Holly Bourne’s books are the latter. Once I start reading them, I can’t put them down. I started What’s a Girl Gotta Do? on…

  24. Book cover for The Radical Element

    The Radical Element

    by Jessica Spotswood

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Last year I reviewed A Tyranny of Petticoats, which came on my radar because I received it in a Book Mail box from Book Riot. When I saw The Radical Element on NetGalley, I wanted to see how the second volume of this anthology series compared. Thanks to NetGalley and Candlewick Press for the eARC! I adored this book for what it is, and while I didn’t love every story, it was a great…

  25. Book cover for Female Chauvinist Pigs

    Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture

    by Ariel Levy

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Although I’ve been familiar with the concept for a while, I think I first came across the term Female Chauvinist Pig in Holly Bourne’s excellent How Hard Can Love Be?. In her novel, Bourne presents us with Melody, a stereotypical busty blonde who struts her stuff and embraces her sexuality and “hotness” because she believes that this is what makes her empowered in today’s society. It’s such an intriguing concept, something that interests me…

  26. Book cover for Crash Override

    Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate

    by Zoe Quinn

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Watching GamerGate unfold from the outside and listening to Zoë Quinn describe it in her own words are two very different things. Crash Override: How Gamergate (Nearly) Destroyed My Life, and How We Can Win the Fight Against Online Hate is more than a memoir; it’s a comprehensive dissection of a flawed facet of the Internet. I read it not just because I wanted to hear Quinn’s account of what happened but understand, from the…

  27. Book cover for Bitch Doctrine

    Bitch Doctrine: Essays for Dissenting Adults

    by Laurie Penny

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Laurie Penny has been one of my favourite authors for a while now. Her incisive takes on how feminism can be more intersectional, more anti-capitalist, have continued to be on point as the United States and UK shamble towards their respective political armageddons (armagedda?). Penny’s Unspeakable Things is the feminist primer for my generation. So when I heard that she had a new book coming out, and that it was called Bitch Doctrine: Essays

  28. Book cover for Beyond Trans

    Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter?

    by Heath Fogg Davis

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This is the book on transgender rights, gender identity and expression, and policy that you never knew you wanted.

    Welcome to the latest instalment of “$#A$^% am I ever behind at reviewing my NetGalley books”. Today I review Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter?, out at the beginning of June from New York University Press. To summarize Heath Fogg Davis’ thesis in one sentence in his own words: “I show why it is in the…

  29. Book cover for Dreadnought

    Dreadnought

    by April Daniels

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Is there a name for the situation where you keep thinking you like a certain genre, but you’re almost unfailingly critical of every book in that genre you read? That’s me and the superhero novel. I want to like superhero novels, desperately. Superheroes fascinate me. But most superhero novels I’ve read don’t quite capture whatever ineffable quality of superheroics that I’m looking for. (To be fair, I also don’t read superhero comics or watch much…

  30. Book cover for If I Was Your Girl

    If I Was Your Girl

    by Meredith Russo

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This review contains minor spoilers regarding some characterization but nothing about the end of the book itself.

    Moving to a new school, for any reason, in one’s senior year can be tough, especially when that school is in a different town and involves living with a dad you haven’t seen in six years. In If I Was Your Girl, Amanda does exactly this. Amanda is transgender, and over the past few years she was…

  31. Book cover for Trans Voices

    Trans Voices: Becoming Who You Are

    by Declan Henry

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I might need to stop requesting non-fiction books from NetGalley, because it seems like I haven’t been very successful with them. In this case I don’t know if I just didn’t read the description properly or didn’t understand it, but I thought Trans Voices: Becoming Who You Are was by a trans author and comprised longer-form interviews with transgender people. Instead, this inaccurately titled book is by a cisgender gay man who intersperses his medicalized,…

  32. Book cover for Here We Are

    Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World

    by Kelly Jensen

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I suppose I should start with one of those disclaimers about how I received a free electronic copy of this from NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers. However, I also preordered two hard copies with my own money (OK, someone else’s money in gift card form) even before that request was approved. But why wait a whole three weeks when I could read it earlier than that? That’s how excited I am for Here We Are:

  33. Book cover for Difficult Women

    Difficult Women

    by Roxane Gay

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I still haven’t read Bad Feminist. But when I saw Roxane Gay’s new collection of short stories up for request on NetGalley, I leapt at the chance to read them. So thanks, NetGalley and Grove Press, for this opportunity.

    Trigger warning in this review and book for discussions of rape and assault.

    In many ways, Difficult Women seems like a kind of spiritual successor to Bad Feminist. Again, I haven’t read the essay…

  34. Book cover for Drawing the Line

    Drawing the Line: Indian Women Fight Back!

    by Priya Kuriyan

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    She doesn’t want to get married.

    She wants her darker skin to be celebrated, not medicated.

    She wants to escape the memories of abuse at the hands of her uncle and break the cycle for her own daughter.

    She wants a job and doesn’t understand why it’s so hard for the men who might hire her to look her in the eye instead of her breasts.

    None of these stories are my stories. My story…

  35. Book cover for Trainwreck

    Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear... and Why

    by Sady Doyle

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Trainwreck was published on my birthday, so it was kind of like Sady Doyle was giving me a birthday gift. Not really, at all, in any way. But still, a great coincidence. I’ve enjoyed reading her writing on various sites for years now, so when I heard she had an honest-to-goodness actual book coming out, I was elated. Fortunately, Trainwreck: The Women We Love to Hate, Mock, and Fear … and Why does not disappoint.…

  36. Book cover for Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus

    Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus

    by John Gray

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Wow, this one was rough. I had to borrow the audiobook version from my library/Hoopla because that was the only format available, and it is the abridged audio edition. I normally avoid abridged editions. What’s the point in missing out on a bunch of the book? In the case of Men are From Mars, Women are From Venus, however, I think I’ll make an exception. This is just a terrible, even actively harmful book,…

  37. Book cover for Men Explain Things to Me

    Men Explain Things to Me

    by Rebecca Solnit

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    The same friend who lent me Decoded asked me if I wanted to borrow Men Explain Things to Me, which is great, because it has been on my list for a while now. When I went over to her house, she handed me the book. A mutual friend who was there and only in town until early the next week then said, “Can you read it really quickly so I can have it?” So…

  38. Book cover for Trumpet

    Trumpet

    by Jackie Kay

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Trumpet is the August pick for the Banging Book Club, an online, tweet-fuelled read of books about sex and sexuality hosted by Hannah Witton, Leena Norms, and Lucy Moon. This is a nice change of pace after a few months of non-fiction books. All of the fiction books so far have been excellent but in such different ways. The two previous novels (Asking For It and All the Rage) had similar topics…

  39. Book cover for A Little Gay History

    A Little Gay History: Desire and Diversity Around the World

    by R.B. Parkinson

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I hate listicles. I’ve gotten to the point where I just don’t click on any post that starts with a number in its title. I know, I know, #notalllisticles, some are well-written and informative.

    A Little Gay History is, when you think about it, a listicle; you could retitle it “82 Objects from the British Museum Related to Gay Sexual Desire”. Listicles were around before the Internet, and I suppose they will outlive the Internet…

  40. Book cover for The V-Word

    The V-Word: True Stories about First-Time Sex

    by Amber J. Keyser

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Back in Grade 4, a small group of peers asked me if I was a virgin.

    Not knowing what a virgin was, I said no. Well, that certainly got them laughing. And I got very upset.

    This incident has stuck in my memory (which is otherwise very much a sieve through which most details inevitably fall) for a few reasons. Firstly, it was one of the few times I ever felt bullied in school,…

  41. Book cover for Vagina

    Vagina: A New Biography

    by Naomi Wolf

    1 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This book was like tearing the scab off a freshly healed wound. It’s been so long since I’ve had to deal with the shittiness that is evolutionary psychology, and then Naomi Wolf comes along and reminds me of just how terrible it is all over again.

    Well, let’s do this.

    Vagina: A New Biography is Wolf’s syncretism of Eastern teachings about sex (particularly Tantra) with Western medicine, with a particular focus on the way women…

  42. Book cover for Indigenous Men and Masculinities

    Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration

    by Robert Alexander Innes

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    “But what about the men?” It’s a common refrain heard from people who have misinterpreted, or been misinformed about, the aims of feminism and its related movements. So-called “meninist” and “men’s rights activists” encourage the question, because they want to push the view that feminists want to attain women’s liberation and equality at the expense of men. As one men’s rights activist discovered, when one engages with the actual critical theory underlying feminism,…

  43. Book cover for Only Ever Yours

    Only Ever Yours

    by Louise O'Neill

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Louise O’Neill is scary good at writing amazing but depressing books. I thought her second novel, Asking For It, was powerful, but her debut, Only Ever Yours, is arguably even darker. I’m happy I picked it up, but not happy having read it—this is about as far from a feel-good book as one gets.

    I want to put some trigger warnings on this book and review but am not sure where to draw…

  44. Book cover for Spinster

    Spinster: Making a Life of One's Own

    by Kate Bolick

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I read most, if not all, of the Anne of Green Gables books as a kid (of course). I was very moved by Anne’s journey and transition to adulthood; even then, I was pretty sure I wanted to be a teacher, and so I was fascinated by her career path. While the details of the story have blurred with time, one memory continues to stick with me. In none book, Anne and a friend are…

  45. Book cover for Asking For It

    Asking For It

    by Louise O'Neill

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Ugh, so many feelings. I’ve consciously been trying to write shorter reviews, but this is not going to be one of those. It will be spoilerific and angry—also, trigger warnings for rape and suicide. If you’re down for all that, buckle up—otherwise, I have literally more than a thousand other reviews you could read right now. Here’s one of the aptly-titled Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, which is funny and uplifting. Asking for It

  46. Book cover for The Vagina Monologues

    The Vagina Monologues

    by Eve Ensler

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Hmm … tricky.

    The Vagina Monologues is the February book for the Banging Book Club, run by Hannah Witton, Lucy Moon, and Leena Norms. It’s also the first book I’ve read for the book club, because I ordered January’s pick, Asking For It, on January 1 … and it only arrived from the UK yesterday.

    Anyway, this is a tough one to review, for a few reasons—not all of them having to do…

  47. Book cover for I’m Coming

    I’m Coming

    by Selma Lønning Aarø

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Full disclosure: I received a free ARC of I’m Coming from House of Anansi Press. In fact, this book came with a tiny promotional package:

    Cellophane bag containing vaginal lubricant, a yellow plastic rabbit, two AA batteries, and a pin

    Yeah, that’s a small package of vaginal lubricant and two AA batteries—presumably to, you know, power Mr Rabbit, or whatever shape one’s vibrator takes.

    Fortunately, one of my friends—who would actually have a use for such items—saw me tweet about this and volunteered to take them off my hands. I…

  48. Book cover for The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy

    The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Handbook for Girl Geeks

    by Sam Maggs

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    This book has an amazing title, and amazing art, and very clever writing. It’s filled to the brim with witty advice and brief interviews from a panoply of self-proclaimed fangirls. So why did it leave me feeling so meh?

    Obvious disclaimer here: I identify as a cis man, so by most definitions I’m not really a fangirl, and I’m never going to experience the discrimination that women often face when they present as geeks…

  49. Book cover for Cycler

    Cycler

    by Lauren McLaughlin

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I very quickly decided I did not like Jill McTeague very much. In fact, my dislike of her was exceeded only by my dislike of her mother (but we’ll get to that). I thought Jill was shallow, rude, and selfish in the way she handles her monthly transformation into Jack.

    And I was right.

    And that’s one reason why Cycler is a powerful book. Although Jill is one of the protagonists and one of the…

  50. Book cover for Lightspeed Magazine, June 2014

    Lightspeed Magazine, June 2014: Women Destroy Science Fiction! Special Issue

    by Christie Yant

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I actually don’t read Lightspeed all that much, so it’s hard for me to evaluate this special edition in that context. All I can say is that this is packed full of good content. In addition to original stories there are reprints, some good flash fiction (one of which is my all-time favourite of the volume), non-fiction discussions and essays, and a novel excerpt. It’s good times.

    I didn’t like every, or maybe even most,…