Books shelved under “Aces”

15 reviews found

  1. Book cover for Loveless

    Loveless

    by Alice Oseman

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    As someone who is herself aromantic and asexual, I was very much anticipating Loveless, to the point where I pre-ordered it. My experience with Alice Oseman has been varied: I adored Radio Silence but didn’t much care for Solitaire. Here I find myself very ambivalent: on one hand, I really enjoyed the aro/ace representation here. On the other hand, I’m not sure that, overall, Loveless is a very good book.

    A note about…

  2. Book cover for Read with Pride

    Read with Pride

    by Lucy Powrie

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    I was so excited to read the sequel to The Paper & Hearts Society, and Lucy Powrie does not disappoint. Read with Pride is another perfect blend of young adult drama, social awareness, and of course, a shameless love of books.

    Olivia Santos (confirmed demisexual, woo!) learns at the start of Year Eleven that her school now requires parental permission to borrow books from the library—all because one parent complained about her son having…

  3. Book cover for Baker Thief

    Baker Thief

    by Claudie Arseneault

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    What's better than a magical mystery? A magical mystery featuring baked goods, you say? Sign me up! Baker Thief is a conventions-busting, inclusive, fun alternate world urban fantasy novel with mysteries and thrills and no small amount of underdogs taking on the corrupt underbelly of corporations.

    It is, in short, a good read.

    Adèle is a detective recently relocated and transferred to a new unit. Shortly after moving in, a masked, purple-haired thief named Claire…

  4. Book cover for The Sound of Stars

    The Sound of Stars

    by Alechia Dow

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Yet again I feel like I steered myself wrong on NetGalley!! The Sound of Stars, courteously provided to me by Inkyard Press, didn’t win me over. What should have been a tale of survival and starcrossed love set in the aftermath of an alien invasion of Earth proved to be a somewhat boring adventure across open country full of exposition and underwhelming action. It’s not all bad—Alechia Dow does her best to give us…

  5. Book cover for Full Disclosure

    Full Disclosure

    by Camryn Garrett

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Um, wow. Full Disclosure caught me by surprise. I was doing a library run, and after hearing this book hyped on Twitter I checked on a lark to see if my library had a copy—not expecting one, because it was so freshly published. Yet my library did have a copy, and I borrowed it, and I read it, and this book is quality. I was expecting to like the book, but honestly, I loved…

  6. Book cover for Let's Talk About Love

    Let's Talk About Love

    by Claire Kann

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Always excited to read a book with any kind of ace-spec rep. Let’s Talk About Love is in many ways your classic coming-of-age YA/NA tale of a protagonist discovering more about herself, her sexuality and romantic identity, and her relationships with her friends. Claire Kann doesn’t make it easy for Alice (or for the reader, for that part). This is a bumpy, uneven book, with parts that shine and parts that make me…

  7. Book cover for Radio Silence

    Radio Silence

    by Alice Oseman

    5 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    With Radio Silence, Alice Oseman accomplishes the literary equivalent of knocking me over with a feather. I’d heard some good things about this book from people whose opinions I trust, yet still … I wasn’t expecting it to be this good. This captivating. Most importantly, this book has such strong portrayals of friendships, both platonic and romantic, and I love it so much.

    Our protagonist is Frances Janvier. Head Girl at her school, on…

  8. Book cover for Tash Hearts Tolstoy

    Tash Hearts Tolstoy

    by Kathryn Ormsbee

    3 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Back in my day, we didn’t have the YouTubes or the social medias, just good ol’ fashioned Angelfire and GeoCities….

    Tash Hearts Tolstoy is a fun, quirky comedy about an eponymous protagonist (Tash, not Tolstoy) whose webseries goes viral overnight. While she deals with how this affects her life and her aspirations, she has to navigate the upheavals in her family and friendships as a result of her sister going to college, her parents expecting…

  9. Book cover for City of Betrayal

    City of Betrayal

    by Claudie Arseneault

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Yes, hello, hi, someone asked nicely on Twitter and got an eARC of City of Betrayal and that someone was me, but then I went and didn’t read it until near the publication date anyway because … busy … and not wanting to sit on my review, but also wanting to hype it up closer to publication. So, although this is an honest review, it most certainly is biased, because I liked City of

  10. Book cover for The Princess Saves Herself in This One

    The Princess Saves Herself in This One

    by Amanda Lovelace

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    We’ll skip the boring part about how I don’t usually read poetry and yadda yadda but this one is an exception blah blah, OK? I’ve had this on my to-read list for a while—in addition to the intriguing title, Amanda Lovelace is asexual (or ace-spec), so that increased my interest. Then one of my IRL friends read and highly recommended it, so I borrowed a copy, and here I am. Reading poetry!

    If I…

  11. Book cover for Truth or Dare

    Truth or Dare

    by Non Pratt

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Non Pratt wrote another novel!!!

    It has a gimmick that throws me back to the ’90s, but it’s fully a novel of the 2010s, fuelled as it is by the spectator society of YouTube eyeballs and the intricate liminal spaces teenagers negotiate between their online and offline identities.

    It also has an aromantic and asexual character. I’m probably going to talk more about this than about the main plot of the novel, because hey, you…

  12. Book cover for Hello World

    Hello World

    by Rose Sinclair

    2 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Just last year, Microsoft announced success at experiments with using DNA for storage, and just this past month, a group of researchers stored an operating system in DNA at a density of 215 PB/g. (It’s hard to put that into context, but you could store the entire book collection of the American Library of Congress thousands of times over in that single gram, not to mention a copy of your own genome.) I’ve kept my…

  13. Book cover for Supernormal Step, Vol. 3

    Supernormal Step, Vol. 3: Power Struggle

    by M. Lee Lunsford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    It has been over a year since I last reviewed a volume of Supernormal Step, the fantastic webcomic by Michael Lee Lunsford about Fiona, a girl with blue hair who has been sucked into a strange, parallel universe where magic is real and that’s really freaky. Fiona has long been on a search for a way home, and while she doesn’t get much closer in this one, she does learn more about the mysterious…

  14. Book cover for City of Strife

    City of Strife

    by Claudie Arseneault

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    Magical cities are one of my favourite tropes in fantasy novels. I think I could read nothing but magical city fiction for a while and take a long time to feel sated or bored; there is so much room for variation. Camorr from The Lies of Locke Lamora is an example that readily springs to mind, but this is a very old trope. As its title implies, City of Strife is very much a story…

  15. Book cover for Supernormal Step, Vol. 2

    Supernormal Step, Vol. 2: A Fine Ado

    by M. Lee Lunsford

    4 out of 5 stars

    Reviewed

    In my previous review I talked in broad terms about why I enjoy Supernormal Step, because I just wanted to outline why it’s worth spending your precious time on a new webcomic/graphic novel.

    In Volume 2 (Chapters 4–6 of the webcomic), M Lee Lunsford broadens our understanding of Fiona and the main cast, but not before Fiona temporarily leaves them behind in search of solitude. (Hint: That does not work out well for her.)